Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Western Arkansas

Goodspeed Publishers, 1891

Fulton County - Biographical

James M. Archer, senior member of the general merchandise firm of Archer, Daniels & Co. Fulton County has within her borders many men to whom she may point with pride; men, who, forgetting their own interests, have labored assiduously, bending all their efforts to one great end–their country's advancement and welfare. These men, in braving the dangers and privations incident to a pioneer's life, have pressed rapidly forward, paving and preparing the way for the advantages now reaped by a younger generation. Such a man is James M. Archer, who was born in Lawrence County, Ark., June 10, 1832, and when but five years of age removed with his parents to Fulton County. He suffered the loss of his mother when still a mere lad, and a few years later his father was stricken down with paralysis, lingering a helpless cripple for sixteen years. This was a terrible blow for young Archer, as it robbed him of his support and reduced him to a state of destitution. It was in this trying ordeal that the boy showed the metal of which he was made. Born of a sturdy line of ancestry, he inherited a vim which refused to bow under adverse circumstances, and here were developed that determination of purpose and untiring energy which has characterized his after life. He is first found occupying the humble position of knife rubber on a steamboat, which he followed for three years, never once complaining of his hard lot. Later he was engaged in labor upon a farm, receiving for his work the mere pittance of four dollars per month, which he saved for the purpose of attending school. His small amount of funds was soon exhausted, and he was compelled to resume his labors, and for five years more was engaged in various occupations. When the war broke out he was not long in making his decision, and, espousing the cause of the Confederacy, he organized the first company of Confederate troops in Marion County, Ark., where he was then located. He assumed the captaincy of this company, which was mustered into service in the Seventh Regiment Arkansas Infantry, and for a short time was stationed at Pocahontas, Ark. He next joined the Regulars and was commissioned regimental adjutant of the Fourth Cavalry, participating in many engagements, among which were the battles of Fitz Hugh's Woods. Ironton, Boonville, Independence and others. After the close of the war be embarked in agricultural pursuits near Salem, Ark., and in 1869 he engaged in business at that town, where he remained until 1882. In 1887 he obtained control of Mammoth Spring, and at once devoted his attention to the general improvement of the place. He is now general manager and secretary of the Mammoth Spring Improvement & Water Power Company, and director of the Calamity Cotton Mills. In 1879 Mr. Archer was elected representative of Fulton County, and reelected in 1881. His wife was Miss Laura Tunstall, of Arkansas, a daughter of Thomas T. and Elizabeth Turnstall, early settlers of this State. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and are held in the highest esteem. In political faith Mr. Archer is an ardent adherent of Democratic principles. He is also a member of the K. of P.

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A. F. Bassham is the present efficient sheriff and ex-officio collector of Fulton County, Ark., and is well-known throughout the county as a man of ability and honor. He was born in Lawrence County, Tenn., January 25, 1859, and is a son of S. H. and Elizabeth (Ray) Bassham, who were born in Tennessee and Alabama, September 9, 1829, and January 1, 1830, respectively. The former grew to maturity and was married in his native State, being there engaged in the pursuit of farming, but after the late war, in which he served on the Confederate side, he emigrated to Arkansas, in 1874, where he followed the same occupation, but is now residing in Salem. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Free-Will Baptist Church. His father, Richard Bassham, was a native and a farmer of Tennessee, and was married to a Miss Pennekuff, who died in Lawrence County, Tenn. In all probability the maternal [p.267] grandfather, Benjamin Ray, was a native of Alabama. A. F. Bassham was reared to the age of fourteen years in Tennessee, since which time he has been a resident of Fulton County, Ark. Being desirous of supplementing the primary education which he received, in the vicinity of his home, with a more thorough knowledge he entered the graded school at Mountain Home, Ark., where his career was marked with rapid advancement. Now thoroughly qualified to enter upon a professional career, he engaged in teaching school, and was one of the popular educators of Fulton County for several years. He gave up this work, however, to assume the responsible duties of his present office, to which he was elected September 3, 1888, by the Democratic party, of which he has always been an active member. He is a Master Mason, and is secretary of Viola Lodge No. 399; also belonging to Salem Lodge No. 28, I. O. O. F. October 15, 1881, he was married to Miss Allie Brown, who was born in 1862, and by her has an interesting little family of three children: Frederick, Maude and William. Mr. Bassham owns a good farm of 120 acres.

W. W. Brooks, now in the employ of the Mammoth Spring Fish Farm, was originally from Troup County, Ga., where he was born in 1851. His father, Capt. Henry Brooks, was born in Jackson County, Ga., in 1816, and was married in Troup County, of the same State, to Miss Eliza Wideman, a native of Troup County, born in 1824. The mother died in 1856, and two years later Mr. Brooks removed to Tallapoosa County, Ala., from there to Pontotoc County, Miss., in 1868, and in 1870 to Independence County, Ark., where he died in 1874. He had been married twice. During his entire life he followed the occupation of a farmer, and was very successful in this pursuit. During the late war he was captain of Company G. Fourteenth Alabama Infantry, Confederate Army, and was with the Army of Virginia until 1862, when he resigned on account of poor health. He then joined Young's company of Alabama State troops and served until the close of the war. He was captured at the surrender of Selma, Ala., and paroled. He was major of the militia in an early day, and held the position of justice of the peace for a number of years. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity for years, and also belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. His father, John Brooks, was born in Jackson County, Ga., and died in Troup County, of the same State. He was of English descent, was a member of the Baptist Church, and was a soldier in the early wars. The maternal grandfather of the subject of this sketch was a native of South Carolina, and died in Troup County, Ga. W. W. Brooks was the third of four sons born to his parents. Like most of the youths of his vicinity, as he grew up he devoted his time and attention to labors on the farm, and in the meantime received a fair education in the common schools. He began for himself at the age of twenty-one and went to the Lone Star State, where he went at braking on the railroad. Later he clerked in a store at Batesville for two years, and was then made deputy sheriff of Independence County. After this he engaged in the milling business, railroading, and was also in the railway mail service for a number of years, or until in March, 1889, when he was employed by his present company. His marriage to Miss Mollie Jeffery occurred in 1882, and two sons were the result. Mrs. Brooks was born in Izard County, and is the daughter of Daniel M. Jeffery, who was also a native of Izard County, where he died in 1888. He was a farmer, also being a Cumberland Presbyterian minister. Mr. Brooks came to Fulton County, Ark., in 1880, lived at Salem three years, and while there was engaged in the milling business. Since then he has resided at Mammoth Spring. He was appointed by President Arthur postmaster at Mammoth Spring, and filled this position in a satisfactory manner for two years. He was justice of the peace from 1884 to 1886, and was postmaster at the same time. In 1885 he was a member of the equalization board of Fulton County, appointed by Gov. Hughes. He was formerly a member of the I. O. O. F. He is an active worker in the Democratic party, and voted for Horace Greeley in 1872.

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Hon. S. A. Brown, ex-member of the Twenty-fifth General Assembly, and one of the largest land owners and farmers of Bennett Bayou, was born in [p.268] the Buckeye State, and is the son of Matthew and Hannah (O'Key) Brown, natives of Ohio. They were married in their native State, and remained there until 1866, he engaged in farming and stock raising. In 1861 the elder Brown joined the United States troops as first lieutenant of Company D, Twenty-seventh Ohio Infantry, and served about one year, participating in the following battles: New Madrid, Island No. 10 and Corinth. When the call for 600,000 troops was made, Lieut. Brown came home, raised a company, was made captain, and joined the One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio Infantry, Company F, and remained with that company for three years. He took part in several noted engagements: Winchester, Cedar Creek, Piedmont, Petersburg and Richmond. He was wounded at Winchester while on picket duty, being shot in the arm. He was discharged at Harper's Ferry in 1864, and came home. In 1866 he went to Southwest Missouri, and in 1869 came to Fulton County, Ark., and bought the place on which his son, Hon. S. A., now resides, for $2,000. Three years later be sold this farm to his son, and bought one on Big North Fork of White River, in Baxter County, Ark., where he died in 1876. He was public administrator of this county for three or four years, and was also county judge of the same county. He was not an office seeker, and was appointed to the positions he held by the Governor. Previous to the war, he had been a strong Democrat, but after that his ideas coincided with those of the Republican party. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity. Nine children were born to his marriage, eight of whom lived to be grown, and seven are now living: Edward, S. A., born December 28, 1839; Catherine, A. R., Nancy (deceased), Mary A., Jennie D. and Josephine. S. A. Brown was a soldier in the late war, having joined Company F, One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio, in his twenty-first year, and served three years. He was discharged on account of a wound, and was afterward captured at Staunton, Va., and kept in prison three months. He was in Libby prison a short period, but the principal part of the time was spent in the hospital. He was paroled at Richmond, Va., on the 12th of August, 1865. While in service he participated in the following battles: Winchester, Gettysburg, and at Piedmont, Va., where he was wounded by a musket ball in the arm. He held the rank of orderly sergeant of his company during the war. After his return home in 1865, he remained there for about a year, and then, in company with his father, moved to Polk County, Mo., where he continued for three years. After this he taught school, and in 1869 came to Fulton County. Ark., where he taught the first free school in this section after the war. Subsequently he engaged in agricultural pursuits, and has continued the same up to the present. On the 8th of December, 1870. Miss Lou Baker became his wife, and to them have been born three children; Claud, born on the 19th of September, 1871; Bettie, born on the 2d of November, 1873, and Bertha, born on the 4th of February, 1881. Mrs. Brown died on the 28th of April, 1882, and Mr. Brown married Mrs. Josie Simpson. nee Tnttle, August 4, 1884, and they have two children, Roscoe C., born on the 16th of August, 1885, and Archie, born on the 16th of April, 1887. Mrs. Brown is the daughter of Capt. T. C. Fluty, of Tennessee, a captain in the Confederate army, and one of the prominent farmers of Baxter County, Ark. Mr. Brown has represented his county in the legislature, and has held several minor offices, filling the position of commissioner of public accounts for two terms. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Queen Elizabeth Lodge No. 360, and is also a member of the I. O. O. F., Vidette Lodge No. 94. He belongs to Simp. Mason Post No. 228. G. A. R., Department of Missouri, and was appointed on the staff of John E. Phelps, commander of the State of Missouri. He is a Republican in politics, and he and Mrs. Brown are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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Thomas J. Brown. No name is more properly placed in the history of the county than that of Mr. Brown, who is not only one of the most enterprising farmers of the county, but is of such a social, genial nature, that he has made many friends. He owes his nativity to the State of Tennessee, where his birth occurred January 5, 1854. [p.269] His parents, John and Caroline (Harber) Brown, are natives of Tennessee. The elder Brown was a sturdy son of toil and followed this occupation in his native State until his subsequent removal to Dunklin County, Mo. His death occurred April 30, 1858. He had been constable in Tennessee and filled the position in a highly satisfactory manner. His marriage took place in 1844, and six children were the result: Henry N., born September 27, 1846, died October 23, 1846; Martin W., born September 30, 1847, died October 14, 1848; Martha J., born December 22, 1849, died May 4, 1886, Joseph M., born January 26, 1852; Amanda C., born July 30, 1858, died February 22, 1876. John Brown, the father of these children, was born on the 19th of July, 1824, and his wife was born on the 20th day of October, 1825. She died August 23, 1888, and was a worthy and consistent member of the Christian Church. Thomas J. Brown commenced life for himself at the age of nineteen years, and his marriage to Miss Eliza J. Pumphrey was consummated on the 24th of August, 1873. She was born in Ozark County, Mo., October 10, 1852. With his parents he left Dunklin County, Mo.; came to Fulton County, Ark., in 1858, and

has been a resident of this county ever since. In 1874 he purchased his present property, and is now the owner of 320 acres of land, 150 under a tine state of cultivation. Over his broad acres roam cattle, sheep and horses and mules, which he makes a specialty of raising. To his marriage were born six children: John W., born on the 13th of June, 1874; Richard W., born on the 12th of February, 1877; Elizabeth C., born on the 20th of August, 1879; Ollie M., born on the 7th of May, 1885; Thomas M., born on the 21st of March, 1887; James E., born on the 6th day of August, 1889. Mr. Brown has made the principal part of his property by his own labor. His wife is the daughter of William G. Pumphrey and Elizabeth (Hawkins) Pumphrey, both natives of Tennessee. They came to Missouri at an early day, settling on The Big North Fork of White River, in Ozark County, Mo., and were married there in 1848. After remaining in that county until 1887, he moved to Boone County, Ark. His first marriage was to Miss Fannie Holt, of Tennessee, who bore him two children, one living at present: Mary. By his marriage to Miss Hawkins he became the father of six children, four of whom survive: Benjamin J. (deceased), Eliza J., George W., Sarah A., M. T., and William (deceased). Mr. Brown is a Democrat and has filled the office of deputy sheriff of his county for two years. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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Charles J. Brunson's life from his earliest recollections has been passed on a farm, his early days being spent in assisting his father on the old homestead in Georgia, in Twiggs County of which State he was born January 7, 1827. His parents, Jarrett N. and Mary M. (Stephens) Brunson, were born in South Carolina, the former's birth occurring about 1797. He was a farmer by occupation, of Scotch descent, and died in Georgia near 1842, being one of thirteen children (eleven sons and two daughters) born to Peter Brunson, who lived and died in South Carolina. Mrs. Mary M. Brunson died in the State of Georgia about 1829, having borne a family of four children, of whom our subject is the third. After his father's death Charles J. began making his home with his elder brother, and while living with him attended school one year, making good use of his opportunities. He then went to his uncle's, Marion Brunson, in Alabama, and again entered school, attending about three months, after which he took charge of his uncle's plantation, and overseered his slaves, who numbered about sixty, for two years. Being offered better wages, he became an overseer for a neighboring planter, remaining with him one year. In 1848 he was married, in the State of Alabama, to Miss Mary Hickman, who was born in Twiggs County, Ga., October 23, 1833, and died in Fulton County, Ark., January 1, 1872. She left, besides her husband, a family of three children to mourn her loss: Charles J., James L. and Anna E. (wife of J. H. Nichols.) Three children are deceased. In the latter part of 1872 Mr. Brunson took for his second wife Mrs. Margaret (Huffman) Willcox, who was born in Davidson County, N. C., November 19, 1837. They have one son, Joseph A. In 1854 Mr. Brunson moved with his family [p.270] to Ashley County, Ark., and there resided until 1865, when he settled in Jefferson County, where he spent two years. Since that time he has been a resident of Fulton County. By his own unaided efforts he has become the owner of a fine farm comprising 280 acres, with about 130 under cultivation, and has made all the improvements, such as building fences and houses, and clearing the land, himself. He served two years in the Confederate army during the Rebellion, and has since been a Democrat in politics. He has held the position of constable both in Alabama and Arkansas, and has been solicited to accept other local offices, but has declined. He and family belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which he has been a member since twenty one years of age. His first wife was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

George C. Buford, dealer in general merchandise, farm implements, etc., Mammoth Spring. Of the many names that make up the strength of the business portion of Mammoth Spring that of Mr. Buford is foremost. His business was established in 1885, and the value of the stock is estimated at about $12,000. Mr. Buford was born in Fredericktown, Mo., October 20, 1849, and is the son of Christopher Y. and Mary (Nifong) Buford, natives of South Carolina and Pennsylvania, respectively. The parents were married in Missouri, and there spent the remainder of their lives. Mrs. Buford died in 1855 and Mr. Buford in 1879. Her father, George W. Nifong, was a native of Pennsylvania, and moved to Southeast Missouri at a very early day, where he died at the age of ninety-eight years. Mr. Buford was married twice. He was a well to-do farmer, stock raiser and general trader, and was also a member of the Masonic fraternity. His father died in Louisiana at the age of eighty years. George C. Buford was one of six children born to his parents, and received a thorough education at Fredericktown, and at Washington University, St. Louis. He also graduated from Reed's Commercial College, of St. Louis, in 1869. Subsequently he taught school for several years in Frederick town, Mo., until 1871, when he removed to Newport, Ark., and there engaged in merchandising and general trading with marked success until 1884. He then came to Mammoth Spring, where he purchased the first business and residence lots sold by the town syndicate. He immediately erected buildings, and built the first brick business house in that town, besides investing largely in real estate there. He is also the owner of considerable real estate in and around Newport, and is one of the most thoroughgoing and active business men in Fulton County. He enjoys an immense trade. He was the assessor of Jackson County, Ark., for four years, and filled that position to the satisfaction of all. He has been married three times; first, in 1874, to Miss Lena Claridge, the daughter of Dr. H. B. Claridge, who came from Tennessee to Jackson County, where he was one of the leading physicians. Mrs. Buford died in 1879, and in 1883 Mr. Buford married Miss Della Harrison, who died in 1884. In 1886 he married Miss Nettie Anderson, daughter of J. L. Anderson, who came from Iowa to Arkansas, where he is living at the present time, engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Buford is a Democrat in politics, and his first presidential vote was for Horace Greeley in 1872. He has been a member of Mammoth Spring Lodge of the I. O. O. F. for twelve years. He and wife are much esteemed members of the Christian Church.

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G. A. Bundren, farmer and stock raiser of Washington Township, was born in Tennessee, January 30, 1847, and passed his youth and early manhood in that State and in Illinois. His parents, G. C. and Lucinda (Keyton) Bundren, were natives of Virginia, the father born in 1807, and the mother in 1823. In their family were five children, four of whom lived to be grown. They were named as follows: James C., who died in the Union army in 1863, and whose family now reside in Johnson County. Ill.: Surena, wife of George Everett, a resident of Williamson County, Ill.; Melissa, wife of David Sollis, living in Duquoin, Ill., and G. A. The father of these children was a successful agriculturist, and followed this occupation in Tennessee until 1851, when he moved to Illinois. He entered land in that State and continued tilling the soil until his death, which occurred in 1882. He was a Democrat in politics, [p.271] but was not an aspirant for office, nor was he active in politics. He was a member of the United Baptist Church, as was also his wife. G. A. Bundren, like so many of the substantial citizens of this county at the present time, was initiated into the mysteries of farming from the very first, and this has since continued to be the calling to which his attention has been directed. He received a fair education in his native State, and in the State of Illinois, and at the age of seventeen began for himself, attending to farm duties in Illinois until 1866, when he moved to Kentucky. Two years later he went to Cape Girardeau, Mo., resided there two years, going thence to Dunklin County, thence in 1876 to Scott County, Mo., and from there, in 1878, to Peach Orchard, Clay County, Ark., where he engaged in the practice of medicine, and also started a drug store. At the same time he filled the position of postmaster. In 1882 he left Peach Orchard, and moved to Knobel the same county, where he embarked in merchandising, and this continued for two years. From there he moved to Woodruff County, Ark., and in connection with farming, practiced medicine, conducting also a mercantile store at Howell Station, on the Batesville & Brinkley Railroad. He remained there but a short time, and in 1885 came to Fulton County, and here attends to his practice in connection with farming. By his marriage to Mrs. Elizabeth Holmes nee Thompson, January 1, 1863, he became the father of six children, three now living: James A., born February 26, 1865, and now living at home; C. W., born February 3, 1869, and also at home, and M. B., whose birth occurred on the 3d of February, 1869, and is at home. The other children died in infancy. Mrs. Bundren died at Knobel, Ark., in 1883; she was a consistent member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Bundren was married the second time in May, 1885, to Mrs. Sarah J. Wilson. nee Young, a native of Kentucky, and the mother of four children, the fruit of her former union. They are named as follows: Hannibal Wilson, living at Alicia, Ark., W. V., also at Alicia, Ark., Mary, wife of H. Hensley, residing at Alicia, Ark., and Celia, wife of T. B. Caple, a resident of Fulton County, Ark. Mr. Bundren is not active in politics, but votes the Democratic ticket. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.

J. M. Burrow, a prominent attorney-at-law at Mammoth Spring, is among those who contribute to the strength of the Arkansas bar. He is a native of Tennessee, born in Bedford County in 1854. His parents, Freeman and Louisa (Nichols) Burrow, were born also in Bedford County, Tenn., in 1834 and 1833, respectively. They resided in that county until 1857, when they came to Sharp County, Ark., where Mrs. Burrow died in 1874. Mr. Burrow is still living, and has followed tilling the soil for many years. He filled the position of justice of the peace for four years, and served four years in the Confederate army with Gens. Price and Freeman. He has been a member of the A. F. & A. M. since 1857, and belongs to the Methodist Church, of which his wife was also a member. Of the six children born to their union J. M. was the eldest. He was educated in the log school-houses, and like the majority of farmers' boys, assisted on the farm. When about twenty-one years of age he taught school, and followed this occupation for two years. When twenty-two years of age he began the study of law, and diligently continued this in connection with farming for several years. In 1885 he was admitted to the bar, and since 1883 has lived at Mammoth Spring. He is one of the most substantial attorneys of Fulton County, and also practices in Sharp and Izard Counties. He was married in September, 1878, to Miss Josie Whiteside, daughter of Allen and Sarah Whiteside, who came to Fulton County from Illinois at an early day, and there the father died. The mother is still living. In politics Mr. Burrow is a Democrat, his first presidential vote being for S. J. Tilden, in 1876. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Myatt Lodge No. 401, and also belongs to Spring River Lodge No. 49, K. of P., at Mammoth Spring. He has a very pleasant home on Eminence Hill, Archer Avenue.

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James Marion Butler. Ever since his location in this county in 1870, Mr. Butler has enjoyed the reputation of being not only a substantial and progressive farmer, but an intelligent and thoroughly posted man in all public affairs; and a short sketch of his life will be of more than passing interest to the citizens of this locality. He was born in Chambers County, Ala., October 15, 1838, and is a son of Nathan H. and Francis R. (Hogue) Butler, who were born in Elbert and Waltham Counties, Ga., respectively, the former's birth occurring in 1818; and like his father, Daniel Butler (who was born in South Carolina, and died in Georgia), he was a worker in wood and a skillful wagon-maker. He and wife were married in Paulding County, Ga., and resided in that State and in various counties in Alabama, until 1855, when they came to Arkansas, locating in White County, but only remained a short time and then moved back to Alabama. In 1863 or 1864, they went to Mississippi and Tennessee, and in 1875 located in Fulton County, Ark., where the father died the same fall. His widow is now residing in Viola, of that county, and is enjoying good health. She is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, as was her husband, and to them were born eight children, of whom James Marion was the eldest. Of these only four are now living: M. L., a blacksmith of Viola; Louisa M., wife of William Smith; William P. H., residing in the State of Colorado, and our subject. Those deceased are Napoleon B., Martha A. E., George W. and Mary J. James Marion Butler received his schooling in the State of Alabama, and while growing to manhood learned the blacksmith and wagon-maker's trade of his father. At the age of twenty-one years he began depending on his own resources for obtaining a livelihood, and from that time until the opening of the Rebellion worked in Alabama. Although his father served in the Union army for some time, he espoused the cause of the Confederacy and first joined the Alabama Legion, which was consolidated and thrown into other regiments, the Twenty-third Alabama Battalion of Sharp-shooters being a part left over. He served two years as sergeant, participating in many battles, among which wore Chickamauga, Petersburg, being intrenched in the ditches of that city for nine months; Hatch's Run, and the Virginia campaign. He received a flesh wound in the leg at Chickamauga, and at Appomattox Court House, about two hours before the surrender, he received a very severe wound in the right arm. After the war he remained in Alabama until 1866, when he went to the State of Mississippi, and from there came to Fulton County, Ark., in 1870, and here has since made his home. In 1879 he moved to his present location, which is a farm consisting of 360 acres of as good land as there is anywhere, and in addition to looking after this property still continues to work at his trade. He is a Democrat in his political views, and in 1885-86 served as justice of the peace. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, and as a citizen of Fulton County has been identified with its advancement and growth ever since locating here. He was married in 1860 to Miss Rhoda Ann Bryaot, a daughter of Alexander Bryant, and her death occurred in Izard County, Ark., in 1875, when thirty-seven years of age. Of the eight children born to her union only four are now living: Charles D., of Texas; Elizabeth E., wife of James A. Talley, a farmer of the county; Nancy E., wife of Abraham L. Reed, a farmer residing near Mansfield, and Nathan D., at home. Mrs. Butler was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

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Thomas B. Caldwell is possessed of those advanced ideas and progressive principles regarding agricultural life which seem to be among the chief characteristics of the average native Missourian. He was born in Franklin County of that State on the 16th of October, 1840, and is a son of James Patten and Ann (Caldwell) Caldwell, the former of Irish descent, born in the State of Missouri, in the year 1816. He was a well known agriculturist of his region, and died in Fulton County, Ark., in 1863. His wife was also born in Missouri, and died when her son, Thomas B., was about seven years of age, her demise occurring in Franklin County. The paternal grandparents were Andrew and Nancy (Farrow) Caldwell, the former being a native Kentuckian. He moved to Franklin County, Mo., during the early history of that country, and died there at his son's home in 1847. His wife, Nancy, died there also. The [p.273] paternal great-grandfather, Kincaid Caldwell, was born in the "Emerald Isle." The maternal grandfather also bore the name of Andrew Caldwell, but the two families were not related. Thomas B. Caldwell is one of two surviving members of a family of five children, the other being a sister residing on the Iron Mountain Railroad in Missouri. He was reared in his native State, but never received any educational advantages in youth, being compelled to assist his father in tilling the home farm; but by contact with the world and by self-application he has become a well posted man. He was twenty years of age when he enlisted in the army, and was a member of Capt. B. B. Bray's Seventh Division of Missouri Volunteers. He participated in the engagements at Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, and in numerous skirmishes. He was second sergeant of artillery for about twelve months prior to the close of the war. On the 9th of March, 1862, he was captured at Mountain Grove, Mo., and was sent to St. Louis, thence to Alton, Ill., and from there to Vicksburg, Miss., where he was exchanged on the 22d of September, of the same year. Nearly ever since the close of the war he has been a resident of Fulton County, Ark., and has been actively engaged in tilling the soil. On the 5th of March, 1865, he was married to Miss Lucintha M. Smith, who was born in South Carolina in 1842, a daughter of Inman and Mary A. Smith. The father died in the "Palmetto State," but the mother is still living and resides in Fulton County, Ark., the wife of a Mr. Hutchesson. To Mr. Caldwell and his wife the following children have been born: James Henry, Benjamin H., Thomas J. (deceased), John H., Mary A. (deceased), Ruthie J. and Joannah. The greater part of Mr. Caldwell's time has been occupied in farming, and he is now the owner of 310 acres of land, with about eighty acres under cultivation. He is a Democrat, his first presidential vote being cast for Douglas, and he was elected on that ticket to the office of deputy sheriff and constable. He and wife are connected with the Christian Church, and he is a Mason and a member of the I. O. O. F. Mr. Caldwell is a man universally respected, and to know him is to have a high admiration for him, for he is possessed of those sterling principles which make a true man and a valuable citizen.

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Capt. John G. Carroll, a farmer of Fulton Township, is now successfully following the occupation to which he was reared and which has been his life work, a calling that for ages has received undivided efforts from many worthy individuals, and one that always furnishes sustenance to the ready worker. He was born in North Carolina in 1834, and is the son of Green and Priscilla (Earles) Carroll, natives of South Carolina and North Carolina, and born in 1802 and 1808, respectively. The parents removed to White County, Tenn., and in 1859 came to Fulton County, Ark., where Mr. Carroll died in 1870. He was the son of Jesse Carroll and the grandson of William Carroll, who was of English descent, went through the Revolutionary War, and died in North Carolina at the age of nearly one hundred years. Jesse Carroll was born in North Carolina, and died in Georgia at the age of ninety-eight years. He was a millwright by occupation. This family is of the same as that Carroll who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. The paternal grandfather, William Earles, was born in North Carolina and died in Tennessee at about the age of one hundred and two years; he was of Welsh descent. His father was a Revolutionary soldier. Capt. John G. Carroll, the second of eight children born to his parents, received very meager educational advantages. He came with his parents to Fulton County, Ark., in 1859 and in 1861 Miss Auerilla Copeland, a native of Tennessee, became his wife. She died in 1879, leaving six children, three sons and three daughters. Capt. Carroll then married Miss Eliza Baize, a native of Missouri and the daughter of George Baize. To this union were born four children, a son and three daughters. Capt. Carroll is one of the prominent agriculturists of Fulton County, is the owner of 520 acres of land, with 300 under cultivation, and also possesses considerable property in Viola, all the result of his own industry. When the war cloud hovered over the United States he enlisted in Company F, Fourteenth Arkansas Infantry, [p.274] Confederate Army, and served three years and eleven months. After the first nine months he was promoted to the rank of captain in his regiment and operated in Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana. He took a prominent part in the battles of Elkhorn, Augusta, Farmington, Corinth, Iuka, Port Hudson, etc. He was captured at Saltillo, Miss., but after sixteen days escaped and rejoined his regiment at Tupelo. At the close of the war he returned to farm life. Politically a Democrat, his first presidential vote was for Buchanan in 1856. He filled the office of deputy sheriff two years, justice of the peace for four years and constable two years. He has been a member of the A. F. & A. M. for twenty-eight years, now belonging to Viola Lodge No. 399, and was master and senior warden for sixteen years of that time. He is also a member of the Eastern Star lodge at Viola. He and wife belong to the Missionary Baptist Church, he having experienced religion at the age of sixteen, and he is a deacon in the same.

B. H. Castleberry is another excellent example of what can be accomplished through energy and perseverance, for he has won his way up to his present enviable position through his own unaided efforts. He was born in the State of Georgia, on the 1st of July, 1854, and is a son of S. G. and Jane E. (Bell) Castleberry, both of whom were Georgians, the former born in 1821. He was a farmer and a miner, but made milling his principal occupation through life, and is still the owner of some gold mines in Georgia, near Cleveland. His father, who was a native of the State, owned some mines there and was also an extensive slave owner at the time of his death. The great-grandfather was a Georgian, but the great great-grandfather and six brothers emigrated from the Old World, and settled in the Southern States. B. H. Castleberry was one of seven children, and his youth and early manhood were spent in his native State. He received his literary education in the North Georgia Agricultural College, and principally through his own efforts secured means with which to prosecute his studies. In December, 1876, he emigrated to the State of Arkansas, settling in Fulton County, where he began the study of law, and the same characteristics which marked his progress at school, were prominent in his legal studies. After a thorough preparation he was admitted to the bar and entered upon his practice at Salem, and his patronage steadily and substantially increased during his two years of practice. At the end of that time he engaged in merchandising with his brother, their stock of goods amounting to about $8,000, and besides this they each own a half interest in 500 acres of land. Our immediate subject also owns 1,500 acres in his own right. He was married on the 10th of April, 1881, to Miss Laura P. Wainwright, by whom he has two interesting children: William Lessie and Rex. Mr. Castleberry is a Democrat, and a member of the I. O. O. F. William Castleberry, his brother, a member of the general mercantile firm of Castleberry & Co., was born in White County, Ga., in 1856, and during his youth and early manhood worked with his father. He received an excellent education in Dahlonega College, Ga., and also at Nacoochee Valley, and after leaving school engaged in mercantile pursuits as clerk in a general merchandise store in the latter place, but eighteen months later went to Rabun County, where he began merchandising in partnership with C. W. Oakes. Two years later they dissolved partnership, and Mr. Castleberry came to Salem, and in 1881 embarked in business with his brother and William Wainwright, keeping a grocery. At the end of one year this association was terminated, and the two brothers started a general mercantile establishment of their own. They thoroughly understand the enterprise in which they are engaged, and have done much in their line to increase the trade and influence of the town. They are thoroughly reliable and honest in all their transactions, and as a result enjoy a large and lucrative custom. William Castleberry is also a Democrat politically, and a member of the I. O. O. F. He is unmarried.

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William D. Chase, one of the prominent millers and farmers of Elizabeth, was born in Maury (now Gordon) County, Ga., in 1839, and is the son of Hon. Dean W. and Alley (Johnson) Chase. The father was born in Pawtucket, R. I., and received [p.275] an unusually good education. At the age of nineteen he was sent to Georgia to erect a spinning factory, which he operated for a number of years. He was married and spent the remainder of his days there and in Tennessee, where he manufactured cotton goods all his life. He died in Gilmore County, Ga., in 1881. He was justice of the peace many years and once represented Gordon County in the legislature. He was also for thirty-five or forty years a traveling minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and besides was an officer in the Mexican War. His wife was a native of North Carolina, and died in Gilmore County, Ga., July 8, 1886. She, too, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Her father, James Johnson, was a native of North Carolina, who died in Walker County, Ga. He was a soldier in the Mexican War. William D. Chase, the second of ten children, born to his parents, received his education in the common schools. He was reared to the arduous duties on the farm, and in 1861 Miss Adeline Sprouell became his wife. She was born in Fulton County, Ga., and was the daughter of Wilson E. and Eliza J. Spronell, natives of Abbeville District, S. C., but who moved to Georgia, where Mrs. Sprouell died. To Mr. and Mrs. Chase were born eleven children, seven sons and three daughters now living. Mr. Chase served over four years in the Confederate Army, Company E, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, was at Cumberland Gap, Richmond, Siege of Vicksburg. Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kingston, Calboun, New Hope Church. Kenesaw Mountain, etc. He was captured several times, the last time at Peach Tree Creek, and imprisoned at Nashville. He was afterward taken to Indianapolis, where he was at the time of the surrender. He never received a wound during his time of service. After the war he returned to the farm and in 1872 came to Fulton County, Ark. He followed agricultural pursuits for five years and then engaged in merchandising at Newburg, Izard County, for three years. This not suiting him he entered into the milling business there for six years, after which he returned to Fulton County, and continued merchandising at Elizabeth for four years. Since then he has been occupied in milling and farming and has two flour and saw, shingle and planing mills. He is also the owner of about 900 acres of land in Missouri, Fulton, Izard and Lawrence Counties. All his property is the result of hard labor since the war. He has been a Democrat in his political views all his life, and his first presidential vote was for Gen. McClellan. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Elizabeth Lodge, and is also a member of Newburg Lodge of the I. O. O. F. in Izard County. Mrs. Chase has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years.

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Thomas J. Brown. No name is more properly placed in the history of the county than that of Mr. Brown, who is not only one of the most enterprising farmers of the county, but is of such a social, genial nature, that he has made many friends. He owes his nativity to the State of Tennessee, where his birth occurred January 5, 1854. [p.269] His parents, John and Caroline (Harber) Brown, are natives of Tennessee. The elder Brown was a sturdy son of toil and followed this occupation in his native State until his subsequent removal to Dunklin County, Mo. His death occurred April 30, 1858. He had been constable in Tennessee and filled the position in a highly satisfactory manner. His marriage took place in 1844, and six children were the result: Henry N., born September 27, 1846, died October 23, 1846; Martin W., born September 30, 1847, died October 14, 1848; Martha J., born December 22, 1849, died May 4, 1886, Joseph M., born January 26, 1852; Amanda C., born July 30, 1858, died February 22, 1876. John Brown, the father of these children, was born on the 19th of July, 1824, and his wife was born on the 20th day of October, 1825. She died August 23, 1888, and was a worthy and consistent member of the Christian Church. Thomas J. Brown commenced life for himself at the age of nineteen years, and his marriage to Miss Eliza J. Pumphrey was consummated on the 24th of August, 1873. She was born in Ozark County, Mo., October 10, 1852. With his parents he left Dunklin County, Mo.; came to Fulton County, Ark., in 1858, and has been a resident of this county ever since. In 1874 he purchased his present property, and is now the owner of 320 acres of land, 150 under a tine state of cultivation. Over his broad acres roam cattle, sheep and horses and mules, which he makes a specialty of raising. To his marriage were born six children: John W., born on the 13th of June, 1874; Richard W., born on the 12th of February, 1877; Elizabeth C., born on the 20th of August, 1879; Ollie M., born on the 7th of May, 1885; Thomas M., born on the 21st of March, 1887; James E., born on the 6th day of August, 1889. Mr. Brown has made the principal part of his property by his own labor. His wife is the daughter of William G. Pumphrey and Elizabeth (Hawkins) Pumphrey, both natives of Tennessee. They came to Missouri at an early day, settling on The Big North Fork of White River, in Ozark County, Mo., and were married there in 1848. After remaining in that county until 1887, he moved to Boone County, Ark. His first marriage was to Miss Fannie Holt, of Tennessee, who bore him two children, one living at present: Mary. By his marriage to Miss Hawkins he became the father of six children, four of whom survive: Benjamin J. (deceased), Eliza J., George W., Sarah A., M. T., and William (deceased). Mr. Brown is a Democrat and has filled the office of deputy sheriff of his county for two years. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

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Charles J. Brunson's life from his earliest recollections has been passed on a farm, his early days being spent in assisting his father on the old homestead in Georgia, in Twiggs County of which State he was born January 7, 1827. His parents, Jarrett N. and Mary M. (Stephens) Brunson, were born in South Carolina, the former's birth occurring about 1797. He was a farmer by occupation, of Scotch descent, and died in Georgia near 1842, being one of thirteen children (eleven sons and two daughters) born to Peter Brunson, who lived and died in South Carolina. Mrs. Mary M. Brunson died in the State of Georgia about 1829, having borne a family of four children, of whom our subject is the third. After his father's death Charles J. began making his home with his elder brother, and while living with him attended school one year, making good use of his opportunities. He then went to his uncle's, Marion Brunson, in Alabama, and again entered school, attending about three months, after which he took charge of his uncle's plantation, and overseered his slaves, who numbered about sixty, for two years. Being offered better wages, he became an overseer for a neighboring planter, remaining with him one year. In 1848 he was married, in the State of Alabama, to Miss Mary Hickman, who was born in Twiggs County, Ga., October 23, 1833, and died in Fulton County, Ark., January 1, 1872. She left, besides her husband, a family of three children to mourn her loss: Charles J., James L. and Anna E. (wife of J. H. Nichols.) Three children are deceased. In the latter part of 1872 Mr. Brunson took for his second wife Mrs. Margaret (Huffman) Willcox, who was born in Davidson County, N. C., November 19, 1837. They have one son, Joseph A. In 1854 Mr. Brunson moved with his family [p.270] to Ashley County, Ark., and there resided until 1865, when he settled in Jefferson County, where he spent two years. Since that time he has been a resident of Fulton County. By his own unaided efforts he has become the owner of a fine farm comprising 280 acres, with about 130 under cultivation, and has made all the improvements, such as building fences and houses, and clearing the land, himself. He served two years in the Confederate army during the Rebellion, and has since been a Democrat in politics. He has held the position of constable both in Alabama and Arkansas, and has been solicited to accept other local offices, but has declined. He and family belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which he has been a member since twenty one years of age. His first wife was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

George C. Buford, dealer in general merchandise, farm implements, etc., Mammoth Spring. Of the many names that make up the strength of the business portion of Mammoth Spring that of Mr. Buford is foremost. His business was established in 1885, and the value of the stock is estimated at about $12,000. Mr. Buford was born in Fredericktown, Mo., October 20, 1849, and is the son of Christopher Y. and Mary (Nifong) Buford, natives of South Carolina and Pennsylvania, respectively. The parents were married in Missouri, and there spent the remainder of their lives. Mrs. Buford died in 1855 and Mr. Buford in 1879. Her father, George W. Nifong, was a native of Pennsylvania, and moved to Southeast Missouri at a very early day, where he died at the age of ninety-eight years. Mr. Buford was married twice. He was a well to-do farmer, stock raiser and general trader, and was also a member of the Masonic fraternity. His father died in Louisiana at the age of eighty years. George C. Buford was one of six children born to his parents, and received a thorough education at Fredericktown, and at Washington University, St. Louis. He also graduated from Reed's Commercial College, of St. Louis, in 1869. Subsequently he taught school for several years in Frederick town, Mo., until 1871, when he removed to Newport, Ark., and there engaged in merchandising and general trading with marked success until 1884. He then came to Mammoth Spring, where he purchased the first business and residence lots sold by the town syndicate. He immediately erected buildings, and built the first brick business house in that town, besides investing largely in real estate there. He is also the owner of considerable real estate in and around Newport, and is one of the most thoroughgoing and active business men in Fulton County. He enjoys an immense trade. He was the assessor of Jackson County, Ark., for four years, and filled that position to the satisfaction of all. He has been married three times; first, in 1874, to Miss Lena Claridge, the daughter of Dr. H. B. Claridge, who came from Tennessee to Jackson County, where he was one of the leading physicians. Mrs. Buford died in 1879, and in 1883 Mr. Buford married Miss Della Harrison, who died in 1884. In 1886 he married Miss Nettie Anderson, daughter of J. L. Anderson, who came from Iowa to Arkansas, where he is living at the present time, engaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Buford is a Democrat in politics, and his first presidential vote was for Horace Greeley in 1872. He has been a member of Mammoth Spring Lodge of the I. O. O. F. for twelve years. He and wife are much esteemed members of the Christian Church.

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G. A. Bundren, farmer and stock raiser of Washington Township, was born in Tennessee, January 30, 1847, and passed his youth and early manhood in that State and in Illinois. His parents, G. C. and Lucinda (Keyton) Bundren, were natives of Virginia, the father born in 1807, and the mother in 1823. In their family were five children, four of whom lived to be grown. They were named as follows: James C., who died in the Union army in 1863, and whose family now reside in Johnson County. Ill.: Surena, wife of George Everett, a resident of Williamson County, Ill.; Melissa, wife of David Sollis, living in Duquoin, Ill., and G. A. The father of these children was a successful agriculturist, and followed this occupation in Tennessee until 1851, when he moved to Illinois. He entered land in that State and continued tilling the soil until his death, which occurred in 1882. He was a Democrat in politics, [p.271] but was not an aspirant for office, nor was he active in politics. He was a member of the United Baptist Church, as was also his wife. G. A. Bundren, like so many of the substantial citizens of this county at the present time, was initiated into the mysteries of farming from the very first, and this has since continued to be the calling to which his attention has been directed. He received a fair education in his native State, and in the State of Illinois, and at the age of seventeen began for himself, attending to farm duties in Illinois until 1866, when he moved to Kentucky. Two years later he went to Cape Girardeau, Mo., resided there two years, going thence to Dunklin County, thence in 1876 to Scott County, Mo., and from there, in 1878, to Peach Orchard, Clay County, Ark., where he engaged in the practice of medicine, and also started a drug store. At the same time he filled the position of postmaster. In 1882 he left Peach Orchard, and moved to Knobel the same county, where he embarked in merchandising, and this continued for two years. From there he moved to Woodruff County, Ark., and in connection with farming, practiced medicine, conducting also a mercantile store at Howell Station, on the Batesville & Brinkley Railroad. He remained there but a short time, and in 1885 came to Fulton County, and here attends to his practice in connection with farming. By his marriage to Mrs. Elizabeth Holmes nee Thompson, January 1, 1863, he became the father of six children, three now living: James A., born February 26, 1865, and now living at home; C. W., born February 3, 1869, and also at home, and M. B., whose birth occurred on the 3d of February, 1869, and is at home. The other children died in infancy. Mrs. Bundren died at Knobel, Ark., in 1883; she was a consistent member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Bundren was married the second time in May, 1885, to Mrs. Sarah J. Wilson. nee Young, a native of Kentucky, and the mother of four children, the fruit of her former union. They are named as follows: Hannibal Wilson, living at Alicia, Ark., W. V., also at Alicia, Ark., Mary, wife of H. Hensley, residing at Alicia, Ark., and Celia, wife of T. B. Caple, a resident of Fulton County, Ark. Mr. Bundren is not active in politics, but votes the Democratic ticket. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.

J. M. Burrow, a prominent attorney-at-law at Mammoth Spring, is among those who contribute to the strength of the Arkansas bar. He is a native of Tennessee, born in Bedford County in 1854. His parents, Freeman and Louisa (Nichols) Burrow, were born also in Bedford County, Tenn., in 1834 and 1833, respectively. They resided in that county until 1857, when they came to Sharp County, Ark., where Mrs. Burrow died in 1874. Mr. Burrow is still living, and has followed tilling the soil for many years. He filled the position of justice of the peace for four years, and served four years in the Confederate army with Gens. Price and Freeman. He has been a member of the A. F. & A. M. since 1857, and belongs to the Methodist Church, of which his wife was also a member. Of the six children born to their union J. M. was the eldest. He was educated in the log school-houses, and like the majority of farmers' boys, assisted on the farm. When about twenty-one years of age he taught school, and followed this occupation for two years. When twenty-two years of age he began the study of law, and diligently continued this in connection with farming for several years. In 1885 he was admitted to the bar, and since 1883 has lived at Mammoth Spring. He is one of the most substantial attorneys of Fulton County, and also practices in Sharp and Izard Counties. He was married in September, 1878, to Miss Josie Whiteside, daughter of Allen and Sarah Whiteside, who came to Fulton County from Illinois at an early day, and there the father died. The mother is still living. In politics Mr. Burrow is a Democrat, his first presidential vote being for S. J. Tilden, in 1876. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Myatt Lodge No. 401, and also belongs to Spring River Lodge No. 49, K. of P., at Mammoth Spring. He has a very pleasant home on Eminence Hill, Archer Avenue.

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James Marion Butler. Ever since his location in this county in 1870, Mr. Butler has enjoyed the reputation of being not only a substantial and progressive farmer, but an intelligent and thoroughly [p.272] posted man in all public affairs; and a short sketch of his life will be of more than passing interest to the citizens of this locality. He was born in Chambers County, Ala., October 15, 1838, and is a son of Nathan H. and Francis R. (Hogue) Butler, who were born in Elbert and WalthamCounties, Ga., respectively, the former's birth occurring in 1818; and like his father, Daniel Butler (who was born in South Carolina, and died in Georgia), he was a worker in wood and a skillful wagon-maker. He and wife were married in Paulding County, Ga., and resided in that State and in various counties in Alabama, until 1855, when they came to Arkansas, locating in White County, but only remained a short time and then moved back to Alabama. In 1863 or 1864, they went to Mississippi and Tennessee, and in 1875 located in Fulton County, Ark., where the father died the same fall. His widow is now residing in Viola, of that county, and is enjoying good health. She is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, as was her husband, and to them were born eight children, of whom James Marion was the eldest. Of these only four are now living: M. L., a blacksmith of Viola; Louisa M., wife of William Smith; William P. H., residing in the State of Colorado, and our subject. Those deceased are Napoleon B., Martha A. E., George W. and Mary J. James Marion Butler received his schooling in the State of Alabama, and while growing to manhood learned the blacksmith and wagon-maker's trade of his father. At the age of twenty-one years he began depending on his own resources for obtaining a livelihood, and from that time until the opening of the Rebellion worked in Alabama. Although his father served in the Union army for some time, he espoused the cause of the Confederacy and first joined the Alabama Legion, which was consolidated and thrown into other regiments, the Twenty-third Alabama Battalion of Sharp-shooters being a part left over. He served two years as sergeant, participating in many battles, among which wore Chickamauga, Petersburg, being intrenched in the ditches of that city for nine months; Hatch's Run, and the Virginia campaign. He received a flesh wound in the leg at Chickamauga, and at Appomattox Court House, about two hours before the surrender, he received a very severe wound in the right arm. After the war he remained in Alabama until 1866, when he went to the State of Mississippi, and from there came to Fulton County, Ark., in 1870, and here has since made his home. In 1879 he moved to his present location, which is a farm consisting of 360 acres of as good land as there is anywhere, and in addition to looking after this property still continues to work at his trade. He is a Democrat in his political views, and in 1885-86 served as justice of the peace. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, and as a citizen of Fulton County has been identified with its advancement and growth ever since locating here. He was married in 1860 to Miss Rhoda Ann Bryaot, a daughter of Alexander Bryant, and her death occurred in Izard County, Ark., in 1875, when thirty-seven years of age. Of the eight children born to her union only four are now living: Charles D., of Texas; Elizabeth E., wife of James A. Talley, a farmer of the county; Nancy E., wife of Abraham L. Reed, a farmer residing near Mansfield, and Nathan D., at home. Mrs. Butler was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

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Thomas B. Caldwell is possessed of those advanced ideas and progressive principles regarding agricultural life which seem to be among the chief characteristics of the average native Missourian. He was born in Franklin County of that State on the 16th of October, 1840, and is a son of James Patten and Ann (Caldwell) Caldwell, the former of Irish descent, born in the State of Missouri, in the year 1816. He was a well known agriculturist of his region, and died in Fulton County, Ark., in 1863. His wife was also born in Missouri, and died when her son, Thomas B., was about seven years of age, her demise occurring in Franklin County. The paternal grandparents were Andrew and Nancy (Farrow) Caldwell, the former being a native Kentuckian. He moved to Franklin County, Mo., during the early history of that country, and died there at his son's home in 1847. His wife, Nancy, died there also. The [p.273] paternal great-grandfather, Kincaid Caldwell, was born in the "Emerald Isle." The maternal grandfather also bore the name of Andrew Caldwell, but the two families were not related. Thomas B. Caldwell is one of two surviving members of a family of five children, the other being a sister residing on the Iron Mountain Railroad in Missouri. He was reared in his native State, but never received any educational advantages in youth, being compelled to assist his father in tilling the home farm; but by contact with the world and by self-application he has become a well posted man. He was twenty years of age when he enlisted in the army, and was a member of Capt. B. B. Bray's Seventh Division of Missouri Volunteers. He participated in the engagements at Mansfield, Pleasant Hill, and in numerous skirmishes. He was second sergeant of artillery for about twelve months prior to the close of the war. On the 9th of March, 1862, he was captured at Mountain Grove, Mo., and was sent to St. Louis, thence to Alton, Ill., and from there to Vicksburg, Miss., where he was exchanged on the 22d of September, of the same year. Nearly ever since the close of the war he has been a resident of Fulton County, Ark., and has been actively engaged in tilling the soil. On the 5th of March, 1865, he was married to Miss Lucintha M. Smith, who was born in South Carolina in 1842, a daughter of Inman and Mary A. Smith. The father died in the "Palmetto State," but the mother is still living and resides in Fulton County, Ark., the wife of a Mr. Hutchesson. To Mr. Caldwell and his wife the following children have been born: James Henry, Benjamin H., Thomas J. (deceased), John H., Mary A. (deceased), Ruthie J. and Joannah. The greater part of Mr. Caldwell's time has been occupied in farming, and he is now the owner of 310 acres of land, with about eighty acres under cultivation. He is a Democrat, his first presidential vote being cast for Douglas, and he was elected on that ticket to the office of deputy sheriff and constable. He and wife are connected with the Christian Church, and he is a Mason and a member of the I. O. O. F. Mr. Caldwell is a man universally respected, and to know him is to have a high admiration for him, for he is possessed of those sterling principles which make a true man and a valuable citizen.

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Capt. John G. Carroll, a farmer of Fulton Township, is now successfully following the occupation to which he was reared and which has been his life work, a calling that for ages has received undivided efforts from many worthy individuals, and one that always furnishes sustenance to the ready worker. He was born in North Carolina in 1834, and is the son of Green and Priscilla (Earles) Carroll, natives of South Carolina and North Carolina, and born in 1802 and 1808, respectively. The parents removed to White County, Tenn., and in 1859 came to Fulton County, Ark., where Mr. Carroll died in 1870. He was the son of Jesse Carroll and the grandson of William Carroll, who was of English descent, went through the Revolutionary War, and died in North Carolina at the age of nearly one hundred years. Jesse Carroll was born in North Carolina, and died in Georgia at the age of ninety-eight years. He was a millwright by occupation. This family is of the same as that Carroll who was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. The paternal grandfather, William Earles, was born in North Carolina and died in Tennessee at about the age of one hundred and two years; he was of Welsh descent. His father was a Revolutionary soldier. Capt. John G. Carroll, the second of eight children born to his parents, received very meager educational advantages. He came with his parents to Fulton County, Ark., in 1859 and in 1861 Miss Auerilla Copeland, a native of Tennessee, became his wife. She died in 1879, leaving six children, three sons and three daughters. Capt. Carroll then married Miss Eliza Baize, a native of Missouri and the daughter of George Baize. To this union were born four children, a son and three daughters. Capt. Carroll is one of the prominent agriculturists of Fulton County, is the owner of 520 acres of land, with 300 under cultivation, and also possesses considerable property in Viola, all the result of his own industry. When the war cloud hovered over the United States he enlisted in Company F, Fourteenth Arkansas Infantry, [p.274] Confederate Army, and served three years and eleven months. After the first nine months he was promoted to the rank of captain in his regiment and operated in Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana. He took a prominent part in the battles of Elkhorn, Augusta, Farmington, Corinth, Iuka, Port Hudson, etc. He was captured at Saltillo, Miss., but after sixteen days escaped and rejoined his regiment at Tupelo. At the close of the war he returned to farm life. Politically a Democrat, his first presidential vote was for Buchanan in 1856. He filled the office of deputy sheriff two years, justice of the peace for four years and constable two years. He has been a member of the A. F. & A. M. for twenty-eight years, now belonging to Viola Lodge No. 399, and was master and senior warden for sixteen years of that time. He is also a member of the Eastern Star lodge at Viola. He and wife belong to the Missionary Baptist Church, he having experienced religion at the age of sixteen, and he is a deacon in the same.

B. H. Castleberry is another excellent example of what can be accomplished through energy and perseverance, for he has won his way up to his present enviable position through his own unaided efforts. He was born in the State of Georgia, on the 1st of July, 1854, and is a son of S. G. and Jane E. (Bell) Castleberry, both of whom were Georgians, the former born in 1821. He was a farmer and a miner, but made milling his principal occupation through life, and is still the owner of some gold mines in Georgia, near Cleveland. His father, who was a native of the State, owned some mines there and was also an extensive slave owner at the time of his death. The great-grandfather was a Georgian, but the great great-grandfather and six brothers emigrated from the Old World, and settled in the Southern States. B. H. Castleberry was one of seven children, and his youth and early manhood were spent in his native State. He received his literary education in the North Georgia Agricultural College, and principally through his own efforts secured means with which to prosecute his studies. In December, 1876, he emigrated to the State of Arkansas, settling in Fulton County, where he began the study of law, and the same characteristics which marked his progress at school, were prominent in his legal studies. After a thorough preparation he was admitted to the bar and entered upon his practice at Salem, and his patronage steadily and substantially increased during his two years of practice. At the end of that time he engaged in merchandising with his brother, their stock of goods amounting to about $8,000, and besides this they each own a half interest in 500 acres of land. Our immediate subject also owns 1,500 acres in his own right. He was married on the 10th of April, 1881, to Miss Laura P. Wainwright, by whom he has two interesting children: William Lessie and Rex. Mr. Castleberry is a Democrat, and a member of the I. O. O. F. William Castleberry, his brother, a member of the general mercantile firm of Castleberry & Co., was born in White County, Ga., in 1856, and during his youth and early manhood worked with his father. He received an excellent education in Dahlonega College, Ga., and also at Nacoochee Valley, and after leaving school engaged in mercantile pursuits as clerk in a general merchandise store in the latter place, but eighteen months later went to Rabun County, where he began merchandising in partnership with C. W. Oakes. Two years later they dissolved partnership, and Mr. Castleberry came to Salem, and in 1881 embarked in business with his brother and William Wainwright, keeping a grocery. At the end of one year this association was terminated, and the two brothers started a general mercantile establishment of their own. They thoroughly understand the enterprise in which they are engaged, and have done much in their line to increase the trade and influence of the town. They are thoroughly reliable and honest in all their transactions, and as a result enjoy a large and lucrative custom. William Castleberry is also a Democrat politically, and a member of the I. O. O. F. He is unmarried.

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William D. Chase, one of the prominent millers and farmers of Elizabeth, was born in Maury (now Gordon) County, Ga., in 1839, and is the son of Hon. Dean W. and Alley (Johnson) Chase. The father was born in Pawtucket, R. I., and received [p.275] an unusually good education. At the age of nineteen he was sent to Georgia to erect a spinning factory, which he operated for a number of years. He was married and spent the remainder of his days there and in Tennessee, where he manufactured cotton goods all his life. He died in Gilmore County, Ga., in 1881. He was justice of the peace many years and once represented Gordon County in the legislature. He was also for thirty-five or forty years a traveling minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and besides was an officer in the Mexican War. His wife was a native of North Carolina, and died in Gilmore County, Ga., July 8, 1886. She, too, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Her father, James Johnson, was a native of North Carolina, who died in Walker County, Ga. He was a soldier in the Mexican War. William D. Chase, the second of ten children, born to his parents, received his education in the common schools. He was reared to the arduous duties on the farm, and in 1861 Miss Adeline Sprouell became his wife. She was born in Fulton County, Ga., and was the daughter of Wilson E. and Eliza J. Spronell, natives of Abbeville District, S. C., but who moved to Georgia, where Mrs. Sprouell died. To Mr. and Mrs. Chase were born eleven children, seven sons and three daughters now living. Mr. Chase served over four years in the Confederate Army, Company E, Georgia Volunteer Infantry, was at Cumberland Gap, Richmond, Siege of Vicksburg. Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kingston, Calboun, New Hope Church. Kenesaw Mountain, etc. He was captured several times, the last time at Peach Tree Creek, and imprisoned at Nashville. He was afterward taken to Indianapolis, where he was at the time of the surrender. He never received a wound during his time of service. After the war he returned to the farm and in 1872 came to Fulton County, Ark. He followed agricultural pursuits for five years and then engaged in merchandising at Newburg, Izard County, for three years. This not suiting him he entered into the milling business there for six years, after which he returned to Fulton County, and continued merchandising at Elizabeth for four years. Since then he has been occupied in milling and farming and has two flour and saw, shingle and planing mills. He is also the owner of about 900 acres of land in Missouri, Fulton, Izard and Lawrence Counties. All his property is the result of hard labor since the war. He has been a Democrat in his political views all his life, and his first presidential vote was for Gen. McClellan. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Elizabeth Lodge, and is also a member of Newburg Lodge of the I. O. O. F. in Izard County. Mrs. Chase has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years.

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Hon. Samuel W. Cochran. For a period upwards of thirty-three years, he whose name heads this sketch has been a resident of Fulton County, and during this time he has enjoyed the reputation of being an honest, upright man in every respect, fully deserving the good opinion with which he is regarded by all who know him. His life up to the time of his location in Arkansas was rather unsettled, but notwithstanding the old saying that "a rolling stone gathers no moss," Mr. Cochran has been quite successful in accumulating worldly goods, and is one of the leading merchants of this county. His birth occurred in Abbeville District, S. C., May 20, 1820, and he was left an orphan when an infant. Until ten years of age he was cared for by an uncle, J. C. Wharton, and from that period until sixteen years of age was taken care of by his guardian, Samuel Jordan. At this time he went with his uncle, Mr. Wharton, to Tennessee, and located at Raleigh near Memphis, but shortly after went to Tipton, and still later to Columbia, of the same State, where he remained two years. He then returned to his old home in South Carolina, where he attended school for one year, after which he came back to Columbia, and was a salesman two years for the mercantile firm of G. Frierson & Co. At the end of this time he again returned to South Carolina, where he remained with his guardian for some time, and was married there to Miss Julia A. Chiles, moving with her at a later period to Case County, Ga., where he gave his attention to farming until 1856. In that year he came to Fulton County, Ark., and located in the neighborhood of where he now lives, continuing [p.276] his farming operations up to 1881, when he opened a store at his present stand, and has met with the best of success in this enterprise. In 1861 he was a member of the State convention, and voted for secession, and in 1863 was elected to represent Fulton County in the State legislature. His wife was a daughter of William Chiles, of Abbeville District, S. C., and was born October 7, 1827, being killed at Rolla, Mo., November 6, 1864. To them were born four children, three of whom are living: William C., a farmer of Fulton County; J. C., also a farmer of the county, and J. D., farming near his father. Samuel W. died in 1863, when twelve years of age. In 1865 Mr. Cochran wedded Miss Martha E. Livingston, a daughter of James Livingston, who was also born in Abbsville District, S. C., her birth occurring in 1831. In 1848 Mr. Cochran was licensed to preach the gospel, having joined the Missionary Baptist Church three years previous, and his wife and children are also members of this church. He is a Democrat politically, and previous to the war held the position of postmaster at Union, and received his last appointment in 1887. When a young man he taught school in Georgia, and also in Fulton County, Ark. Mr. Cochran's parents, Clark and Sarah (Wharton) Cochran, ware born in Abbeville District, S. C., where the father was engaged in merchandising and farming until his death. He was of Scotch-Irish descent, and was a son of John Cochran, a native of Virginia, and a soldier in the Revolutionary War. He died in South Carolina. The maternal grandfather, Pleasant Wharton, was born in the "Palmetto State." A large extent of land in South Carolina was given his ancestors by George III, and has been in possession of the family ever since that time.

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Alvah L. Cooper, farmer and stock raiser, and the recently appointed postmaster of the thriving little city of Mammoth Spring, was born in Tompkins County, New York, April 1, 1842, and was the fourth of ten children, eight now living, born to Laban D. and Sarah M. (Woodin) Cooper, both of whom were born in Dutchess County, N. Y., the former in 1780, and the latter in 1812. In the primitive days of the Republic, the Coopers were among its most valiant defenders. In the gloomy days of 1778, when the notorious Tory refugee, John Butler, defeated his cousin, Col. Zeb Butler, and so unmercifully massacred the inhabitants of Wyoming, Penn., the paternal grandfather became one of the victims. Laban Cooper was of English descent, and a soldier in Gen. Scott's brigade, receiving four different gun-shot wounds. At the memorable battle of Lundy's Lane or Bridgewater, he was wounded twice, one of which was received while assisting Col. Miller in his historical charge on the British batteries on the heights, the key to the British position. In the no less eventful battle of Chippeway he was wounded. He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant for services rendered during the war, and as his wife is still living, she now receives a pension. She resides at Mountain Lake, Penn., at the age of seventy-seven years. Alvah Cooper's youth was spent in Bradford County, Penn., and his education was there received in the public schools. He and two of his brothers served nearly four years each in the late Rebellion. Alvah enlisted May, 1861, in Company F, Sixth Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, was elected captain and transferred to Company D. One Hundred and Thirty-Second Pennsylvania Volunteers of the Second Army Corps. From the battle of Bull Run to the closing scene at Appomattox, he was in all the principal battles in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, never receiving a wound. Mr. Cooper has been in the employ of the Government as special pension examiner and other positions almost continually since the war, and has ever been a consistent, hard working Republican. It was in recognition of his services and abilities as a political organizer that he was recently appointed postmaster at Mammoth Spring. He is thoroughly imbued with the principles of the Republican party, and is an indefatigable political worker, and has probably done more than any other single man toward organizing the Republican party of this part of the State. He was one of the first to join the G. A. R., and has held many offices of trust in that order. Before coming to this State he was elected commander of the Soldiers' and Sailors' encampment of Bradford [p.277] County, also chairman of the Bradford County Soldiers' and Sailors' Monumental Association, for three years. On leaving his native State he resigned both positions, but was held in such high esteem by his comrades that his resignation was not accepted, and he continued to hold his office until the expiration of his term although out of the State. For a number of years he was a director of the Agricultural Society of Bradford County. In 1866 he was married to Miss Sarah Ann Larcom, a native of Bradford County, Penn., born in 1843, and dying in 1883; to them were born these children: Mintie M., wife of F. L. Sayles; Elmer C., Woodard C., killed when fourteen years of age; Gracie, Fred. C., Nellie, Warner and Grant. In 1886, like many of the hardy sons of the East, desiring a more congenial clime and soil in which to care for his family, he started toward the "Sunny South" to try his fortunes. The wood land of Arkansas pleased him. He and his son each homesteaded 160 acres, and have purchased 240 acres in addition, making in all a ranch of 560 acres of land. In every day life Mr. Cooper is looked upon as an energetic, honest citizen. He spends his time closely in building up his farms and superintending the postoffice, and if fortune continues to smile on him, in a few years he will be one of the most prosperous as well as one of most prominent citizens of North Arkansas.

Charles W. Culp, M. D., is one of the rising young members of the medical fraternity of Fulton County, Ark. He was born in Izard County, of the same State, May 14, 1858. His parents, Thomas and Elizabeth (Benbrook) Culp, were born, reared and married in Izard County, the former's birth occurring in 1831, and his death March 8, 1880. The paternal grandfather, Thomas B. Culp, was a Tennesseean, who removed to Izard County. Ark., at an early day and took a prominent part in aiding in the growth and development of this region. and both he and his son Thomas were physicians. They were of German descent, and all the male members of the family have been Democrats in their political views. Of the family of eight children born to Thomas and Elizabeth Culp, four are now living, two sons and two daughters, all of whom reside in Fulton County, with the exception of a daughter, who is a resident of Izard County, Dr. Charles W. Culp received his literary education in the common schools of Izard County, after which he entered the Memphis Hospital Medical College, from which institution he was graduated as an M. D., February 25, 1885. Previous to graduating he had practiced the profession (since 1879), and has won an enviable position among the medical fraternity of Fulton and surrounding counties. December 22, 1880, he was married to Miss Joannah C. Sharp, who was born in Sharp County, Ark., December 4, 1861, and is a daughter of Ephraim Sharp, whose sketch appears in this work. Dr. Culp is a Royal Arch Mason, belonging to Rural Chapter No. 50, Evening Shade, Sharp County. He is also a member of Ash Flat Lodge No. 159, F. & A. M., Ash Flat, Ark. He is a Democrat. his first presidential vote being cast for Hancock, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. His mother is a resident of Fulton County, and is the worthy wife of J. M. Cook.

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W. H. Culp, editor and proprietor of the Mammoth Spring Monitor, at Mammoth Spring. Ark., is of German descent, the name originally being Kolb, but it was changed to Culp when the family became Americanized. He was born in Izard County, Ark., November 5, 1863, and after acquiring a fair education in the common schools he entered the office of the Clipper. at Melbourne, Ark., and learned the printer's trade. In 1882 he bought a half interest in the Izard County Register, at Melbourne, and in August, 1884. purchased the remaining interest and conducted the paper with highly satisfactory results until November, 1886. when he leased the press and moved to Lee County, Ark., where he spent a part of the following year in an unsuccessful attempt to raise a cotton crop. Moving to Mammoth Spring. Ark., he established the Mammoth Spring Monitor, the first number being issued February 2, 1888. This paper has proved a decided success financially, and is one of the spiciest, best and most ably edited business papers in Northwest Arkansas, and Mr. Culp has become well known throughout the State [p.278] as one of its most successful editors. He established the Thayer Tribune at Thayer, Mo., in 1888, but has since sold it and is now devoting his time and energies to the publication of the Monitor. He was married in 1884 to Miss Amy D. Owen, of Forrest City, Ark., she being a daughter of Dexter Owen, who was born in Providence, R. I. They have two children: Homer and Madge. Mr. Culp is a son of Dr. T. B. and Elizabeth (Benbrook) Culp, the former's birth occurring in Izard County, Ark., in 1835, and his death in Melbourne of the same county in 1880. His widow still survives him and is a resident of this county, being forty-five years of age.

Judge Thomas J. Cunningham, a prosperous Fulton County farmer, came originally from Randolph County, Mo., his birth occurring December 31, 1837. His father, Robert H. Cunningham, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1808, and in 1834 emigrated to Randolph County, Mo., where he was one of the earliest settlers. He was an active tiller of the soil there until about 1867, and from that time until his death, in 1868, he resided in Fulton County, Ark. His parents, James and Jane Cunningham, removed from Tennessee to Randolph County several years prior to their son, and both died in Adair County of that State. The wife of Robert H. Cunningham was born in Tennessee in 1810, and died in Fulton County, Ark., in August, 1886, having borne a family of ten children, nine of whom grew to mature years, and eight of whom are yet living. Four sons and one daughter reside in Fulton County, one son lives in the State of Texas, a daughter in Randolph County, Mo., and one son in Macon County, Mo. Thomas J. Cunningham is the fourth of the family, and from his earliest recollections has been familiar with the details of farm life; while growing up he learned lessons of industry, frugal habits and economy, which he has never forgotten. His rudimentary education was acquired in the common schools, and was supplemented by a collegiate course in Macon County, Mo. He remained with his father and mother until 1861, when, full of zeal and enthusiam for the land of chivalry and the cause of the South, he joined Gen. Price's command, whose division was commanded by Gen. John B. Clark, Sr., and served two years, participating in the battle of Lexington and numerous other engagements. In 1863 he went by mule train to California, in which State he remained until 1870, being engaged in farming, and in that year he left California and came to Fulton County, Ark., and located near where he now lives. In 1866, while in California, he was married to Miss Mary E. Proctor, who was born in Randolph County, Mo., in 1841. She died in 1873, in Fulton County, Ark, having borne a family of four children: Julia, wife of William T. Cunningham, of Texas; Jennie D., wife of John D. Isenhour, of Fulton County; Rollen P., now in Texas, and Robert H. (deceased). In 1875 Mr. Cunningham united his fortunes with those of Miss Sarah E. Jeffery, a native of Izard County, Ark., born October 26, 1853. Her parents are Rev. Daniel and Nancy Jeffery. To Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham were born the following children: Robert C. (deceased), James C., Edgar, Margaret Ann, Ida, Thomas J. and Henry K. Mr. Cunningham has resided in Fulton County sufficiently long to enable his many sterling qualities to become well known. About forty-five acres of his 180 acre farm are under cultivation. He is a Democrat, and in 1874 was elected judge of the county court, and served six successive years, making an able and efficient officer. His first presidential vote was cast for John C. Breckenridge. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

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Charles C. Davis, surveyor of Fulton County, and one of the enterprising agriculturists of Mammoth Spring Township, was born in Webster County, Mo., January 22, 1854, receiving a very meager education in the common schools. He followed the plow for his father until nineteen years of age, and was then united in marriage to Miss Nancy C. Young, a native of Oregon County, Mo., August 11, 1872, the daughter of J. L. Young. Mrs. Davis died April 17, 1885, and September 18 of the same year Mr. Davis married Martha, sister of his first wife. Her parents were natives of St. Francois County, Mo., now of Oregon County, Mo., and Mr. Young served in the Confederate army as [p.279] a private. By his first marriage Mr. Davis became the father of five children. three sons and two daughters, and to his second union were born two children, both sons. Since his first marriage he has lived on his present farm, one mile east of Mammoth Spring, where he has 900 acres of good land, with 130 under cultivation. He followed farming and also dealt in stock until the railroad was built, after which for some years he was local agent, locating settlers, etc. He has been a practical surveyor for some time, surveying for the county, and in 1888 was elected county surveyor for two years. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party, and his first presidential vote was for S. J. Tilden in 1876. He is a member of the Masonie fraternity, Myatt Lodge No. 401, and was Junior Warden one year. Mr. Davis is pleasant and agreeable in his demeanor to all with whom he comes in contact, and is a man who attracts the regard of all who approach him. He is universally respected by his fellow citizens. He is the son of Eliphaz and Permealey Davis, and the grandson of Charles C. Davis, who was born in Jackson County, Ill, in 1800, and died in Oregon County, Mo., in 1878. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk War, was justice of the peace and also county judge for some years. He was of Welsh descent. Eliphaz Davis was born in Randolph County, Ark., January 1, 1822, and was married in that county to Miss Edwards, a native of Indiana. From there they moved to Webster County, Mo., and in 1858 to Oregon County, where Mrs. Davis died in 1863. Mrs. Davis is still living there. He is a member of the Christian Church (as was also his wife). and is a successful farmer.

Lee Davis. Under the efficient management of Mr. Davis the Fulton County Banner has come to be regarded as one of the representative journals of the county. and although he has only been its editor since 1887, he has proven himself to be a man of good judgment in directing the editorial policy of his paper. He is a native of the county in which he is now residing, his birth occurring in 1865, but received his education in La Crosse, Izard County, Ark., and as the school was good, he acquired an excellent education. After training the "young idea" for some time, he first entered the journalistic field in 1884, in Elizabeth, Ark. In 1887 he purchased the Banner, at Salem, Ark., a paper which he has since edited in a very efficient manner, and through the columns of this journal he has wielded no slight influence in directing the proper steps to be takenfor worthy movements. As the worth of his paper becomes known the circulation increases accordingly, and he has won the patronage of all the better class of citizens in the county. He was first married, at the age of nineteen years, to Miss Josie Lytle, a native of Tennessee, who died ten months after her marriage, and after remaining a widower until 1889, he wedded Miss Mary Jeffery, whose birth occurred in Izard County, Ark. Mr. Davis is one of eight children born to Solomon M. and Eliza (Pipkin) Davis, who were born, reared and married in the State of Tennessee, and who lived there until a number of their children were born, after which they moved to Missouri, being among the pioneers of that State. After residing there a number of years they came to Arkansas, being among the first settlers of Fulton County. The father was an officer in the Confederate army, and died in 1880, at the age of forty-nine years. He was a farmer by occupation, and is still survived by his widow. Our subject's paternal and maternal grandfathers, G. A. Davis and G. F. Pipkin, were also Tennesseeans by birth.

Dr. D. S. Deaderick, real estate agent, Mammoth Spring. In that proud series of names which have aided materially in developing the business interests of Fulton County, that of Mr. Deaderick holds a leading place. He was born in Saline County, Mo., in 1842 and is the son of John S. and Ellen (Cotter) Deaderick, and grandson of David Deaderick, who was a native of Tennessee. John S. Deaderick was born in Georgia in 1819, and in 1840 was united in marriage to Miss Cotter, at Potosi, Mo. She was born in Pittsburg, Penn., in 1820. After marriage the parents removed to St. Louis, where the father was interested in the shot tower. In 1848 they moved to Saline County of the same State, and there he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1857, when they [p.280] moved to Plattin Rock, in Jefferson County. During the year 1861 they were in different parts of the South, and in 1865 returned to St. Louis, where Mr. Deaderick was occupied in wool manufacture for several years. In 1874 they came to Mammoth Spring and were the first settlers here. He erected a flour-mill and cotton-gin, which he operated until June, 1887, when he sold out. He was a thorough-going business man and was at one time quite wealthy. His death occurred in 1887. Florence Cotter, the grandfather of Dr. Deaderick, was a native of Ireland and came to the United States about 1796. He settled in Pennsylvania, where he died early in the present century. Dr. D. S. Deaderick, the eldest of two sons and one daughter, received his education in the St. Louis University. During the late up-pleasantness between the North and South he served four years in the Confederate Army, Company E, Second Missouri Cavalry. He enlisted as a private and came out as adjutant of the regiiment. He operated in Missouri, Tennessee and Mississippi with Gen. Forrest, and was wounded several times. After the war he engaged in the lumber business in Iron and St. Francois Counties, Mo., and in 1870 took up the study of mediicine and graduated at the St. Louis Medical College in 1872. He then practiced in that city until 1874, when he came to Mammoth Spring, and in company with his father embarked in milling and merchandising, and was also for a number of years interested in the real estate business. He has continued the real estate business in town and besides is the owner of several farms in Missouri and Arkansas. In his political views he affiliates with the Democratic party, and his first presidential vote was cast for Gen. Hancock in 1880. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Myatt Lodge No. 401, and Evening Shade Chapter No. 50. He is also a member of Mammoth Spring Lodge No. 48, I. O. O. F. His only sister is the wife of J. D. Lucas, of St. Louis, and his brother, Dr. James S., is a practicing physician of De Soto, Mo. His mother is still living and resides at Mammoth Spring. The family are members of the Catholic Church.

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William Deatherage, one of the foremost farmers of Mount Calm Township, on Bennett River, owes his nativity to Tennessee, where he was born in 1842. His father, A. J. Deatherage, was born in Tennessee, about 1811, and died in Roane County, of that State, in 1847. The latter was married in his native State to Miss Sarah Jackson, also a native of Tennessee, born about 1822. Three children were the result of this union, William being the eldest. One was drowned in the Tennessee River, by the overturning of a skiff, when only seven years of age, and Martha, became the wife of O. B. Fuller, and is now living in Tennessee. Mrs. Deatherage was married the second time, in 1850, to W. F. Ellis, and by this union became the mother of eight children, six daughters and two sons: Sarah (deceased), Margaret (deceased), Minerva, wife of George Jones, and now living in Tennessee; Nancy and Becky (twins), were married to twin brothers, Samuel and Elijah Kelon, and live in Tennessee; Caleb, Franklin, and Mary, at home with her mother. A. J. Deatherage was a major in the United States army when the Indians were moved to Indian Territory. William Deatherage commenced for himself in life by joining the Confederate army, Company A, Twenty-sixth Tennessee Infantry Regiment, on the 15th of June, 1861, and served about four years. He participated in sixteen hard-fought battles, the principal ones being Fort Donelson, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Taylor Ridge Gap, Swamp Creek, Resaca, New Hope, Marietta, Jonesboro, Columbia, Franklin, Nashville; was with Forrest at Murfreesboro the second time, Columbia. Bentonville, Chickasaw Mountain, etc. He surrendered on the 5th of April, 1865, at Greensboro, N. C., after which Mr. Deatherage returned to Greeneville, Tenn., and from thence home, where he commenced farming. He started out after the war with nothing but a Confederate suit of clothes, with forty-eight bullet holes in it. He was married, May 28, 1868. to Miss Rebecca Hall, of Tennessee, and in the fall of the following year he came to Fulton County, and settled on Bennett's Bayou, and there remained three years. In 1873 he moved to his present fine property. consisting [p.281] of 267 acres, with 100 acres improved. He has good buildings, and a comfortable home. As he has had but little help since commencing for himself, he is the architect of his own fortune. To his marriage were born eleven children, eight living at present: Susan, born October 12, 1870; E. J., born February 9, 1872; G. W., born on the 3d of September, 1874; Lydia M., born on the 8th of September, 1876; Sarah A., born on the 5th of December, 1878; W. S., born on the 5th of March, 1880; James K. P., born on the 12th of October, 1885, and Nancy, born on the 11th of June, 1888. Mr. Deatherage has been justice of the peace of his township for one term. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, County Line Lodge No. 373, and in his political opinions is with the Democrats. Mrs. Deatherage is the daughter of Elijah and Lydia Hall, who were the parents of eleven children, the following living: Samuel, Elisha, Mollie, Elijah, Lydia, Thomas, Rebecca D. and J. K. P.

James Dinwiddie is a man whom nature seems to have especially fitted to be a farmer, for he has met with good success in his farming operations. He was born in Greene County, East Tenn., on the 14th of August, 1856, and is a son of Calvin and Mary (Carr) Dinwiddie, the former being also a native of East Tennessee, his birth occurring February 23, 1828. He was a school teacher in his youth, and by trade was a tailor, and these occupations he followed in his native State until 1859, when he moved to Arkansas. While at Greenfield, Mo., in 1864, he was captured by the Federal troops and taken to Indianapolis, Ind., where he died the same year from the effects of a wound received from a sabre at the time of his capture. He was a son of James H. Dinwiddie, who died in East Tennessee, Mary (Carr) Dinwiddie was born in Knoxville, Tenn., April 5, 1836, and died in Arkansas on the 13th day of December, 1885. Of her two children, James, the subject of this sketch, was the elder. His youth was spent in Arkansas, and in this State his early scholastic advantages were enjoyed, though only such as the common schools of that period afforded. He has resided in Fulton County since February 11, 1862, and has thoroughly identified himself with the interests of this section, owning an excellent farm comprising 160 acres of land. He is industrious and enterprising, and his present farm denotes him to be possessed of thrift and energy. He is a Democrat in his political views. Miss Elizabeth Taylor became his wife on the 16th of February, 1888. She was born in Fulton County, Ark., in 1871, and is a daughter of C. C. and Mary Taylor, both of whom are now deceased.

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John L. Golden. Among the prominent farmers of Washington Township appears the name of the above mentioned gentleman, whose success as a tiller of the soil is second to none in the township. He was born in Weakley County, Tenn., on the 27th day of July, 1849, and since early youth has applied himself steadfastly to agricultural pursuits, and with what success may be inferred when the fact is mentioned that he is the owner of one of the finest tracts of land in this section of the county. He is the son of J. C. and Mary (Winn) Golden, both natives of Mississippi, and of English parentage. The father was born in 1824, was a tiller of the soil, and moved to Tennessee at a very early day. They were the parents of ten children, seven living to be grown: S. D. (deceased), W. W., lives in Lawrence County, Ark.; James H. (deceased), J. L., Martha, wife of Alexander Cannon; Jesse F., Lydia J., wife of George Dunivan. Mr. Golden was a Democrat during his life, and had accumulated considerable property which he lost during the war. John L. Golden commenced work for himself at the age of twenty-one, and has tilled the soil assiduously ever since. When first starting out for himself he was possessor of $85, one horse, a few hogs, and a little corn. He is now the owner of 249 acres of land, with about 140 acres under cultivation, besides having his farm well stocked with horses, cattle, hogs, and all else to be seen on a well conducted farm. He left Tennessee in 1872, settling in Independence County, Ark., and there remained for three years. In 1875 he came to Fulton County and followed farming on rented land. He then bought a farm of eighty acres, improved the same, and in 1884 sold out and bought his present property. He was married on the 6th [p.282] of January, 1879, to Miss Rachel M. Anderson, and two children have been born to this marriage: Lula A., born August 2, 1883, and Luther F., born May 20, 1889. Mrs. Golden is the daughter of J. M. and Martha J. (Kelton) Anderson, natives of Tennessee, and the parents of five children, four now living: J. C. (deceased), Rachel M., Lucy A. M., wife of Jasper Rives, of Fulton County; Martha C., wife of Alexander Sanders, and Harriet L., wife of James Lingle, of Fulton County. Mr. Anderson came to this State in 1874, settling first in Stone County, and in 1875 moved to this county, where he has since resided. He has been postmaster at Ten Mile postoffice for thirteen years, and is a much esteemed citizen. John L. Golden votes with the Democratic party, and Mrs. Golden is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Amos E. Golder has passed the uneventful life of the farmer, continuing steadily to pursue the even tenor of his way, and is now ranked among the prosperous farmers of Fulton County, being the owner of 312 acres of land in the home place, of which forty-eight are under cultivation, and seventy-five acres in Myatt Township. He was born in Phillips County, Ark., October 27, 1842, and is the second of eight children born to Dr. James B. and Mary (Bond) Golder, whose births occurred in Richmond, Va., October 3, 1816, and Knox County, Tenn., May 27, 1813, and died in Randolph and Fulton Counties, Ark., December 26, 1861, and January 9, 1888, respectively. Dr. James Golder removed to Phillips County, Ark., at an early day, and was there married, moving in 1852 to Fulton County, of which he was one of the early settlers. Politically he was a Democrat, and held the office of justice of the peace, and was also postmaster in Fulton County. He served in the Confederate army, and just prior to his death was to have been appointed regimental surgeon. Amos E. Golden and his brother, J. M., are the only ones of their parents' family who are now living, and both reside in Fulton County. The former has lived here since ten years of age, but before reaching his twenty-first birthday he received only few educational advantages. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Seventh Arkansas Regiment of the Confederate States Army, and served until he was captured at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., in 1864. He was taken to Chicago, Ill., and after being kept in captivity five months, was liberated and soon after joined the United States army, and served from 1865 to November, 1866. After receiving his discharge he returned to Arkansas and resumed farming in Fulton County. On the 5th of September, 1867, he was married to Miss Mary R. Partie, who was born in Izard County, Ark., on the 6th of April, 1843, and by her has had a family of eight children; James (deceased), Elizabeth R. (deceased), George A., Laura (deceased), Martha, Emma (deceased), Peter E., and Amos G. (deceased). Mr. Golder is a Democrat, his first presidential vote being cast for Greeley. He is a Master Mason, belonging to Myatt Lodge No. 407. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mrs. Golder's parents, George and Mary Partie, were born in Kentucky and Tennessee, November 25, 1811, and March 4, 1814, respectively. They were married in Arkansas. The maternal grandfather, Louis Partie, was born in Kentucky in 1763, and in 1814 emigrated to Arkansas. locating near Mount Olive, being one of the first settlers of that part of the State. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Ramsey, was born in Maryland, in 1768, and was of English descent. Mr. Partie was a French Canadian. They were married in 1787. Soon after the former joined the United States army, and served three years in the defense of the Union. The great-grandfather, Charles Ramsey, spent seven years of his life in fighting for the liberty we now enjoy. This has been handed down to the present generation by Mrs. Golder's grandmother, who now rests under the sod on the bank of White River.

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J. R. Green, farmer, Bennett's Bayou, Fulton County, Ark. The father of Mr. Green. William Green, was a native of Alabama, and after reaching manhood was united in marriage to Miss Rosanna Deshazo, a native of Tennessee, in 1857 or 1858. To this marriage were born four children, two now living: J. R. Green, born on the 24th [p.283] of May, 1859, and Susan, wife of L. C. Woods. The parents moved to Arkansas in 1861, settling in Izard County until after the war, and then, in 1866, moved to Fulton County. They purchased a farm on Bennett's River, and this he improved in every respect. During the late Civil War the father served in the Confederate army nearly the whole time of the conflict, and was with Gen. Price on his raid through Missouri. He was a Democrat in politics, and although a man who had received but limited educational advantages, had improved his time to such an extent that he was considered well-informed on all subjects. Mrs. Green was married the second time, about 1870, to Mr. W. Harber, by whom she had two children: Rebecca Jane, born in 1872, and Mary E., born in 1874. Mr. Harber was born in Crockett County, Tenn., and was married to Mrs. Green in Greene County, Ark. He died in 1874. He was a man who had taken a prominent part in the politics of the county, and voted the Democratic ticket. He was a member of the Christian Church. Mrs. Harber was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. J. R. Green's chances for an education were very limited and the principal part of his youthful days were spent on the farm. On the 10th of July, 1884, his marriage to Miss F. A. Wilson, of Alabama, took place. She, also, had received rather limited advantages for an education, but, like her husband, she has improved her time by study and observation. They are the parents of three children: M. C., born on the 6th of July, 1885; W. H., born on the 17th of March, 1887, and Rebecca, born on the 29th of April, 1889, Mr. Green commenced farming in 1884, and has continued this pursuit up to the present. He is the owner of a fine farm of 280 acres, which he paid for by the honest sweat of his brow. Although of limited education himself Mr. Green is always in favor of public schools, and is a liberal contributor to that and all other laudable enterprises. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Waterville Lodge No. 50. He is also a member of Vidette Lodge No. 94, I. O. O. F. In politics his political preference is with the Democratic party. His wife is the daughter of W. H. and M. J. (Driscol) Wilson, natives of Alabama, and the parents of only one child, Mrs. Green. Mrs. Wilson died on the 4th of January, 1870, in full communion with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Wilson married the second time, Miss Martha Graves, of Alabama, on the 25th of December, 1870, and they became the parents of four children, three deceased. The one living is William H., whose birth occurred on the 25th of December, 1874. Mr. Wilson resides in Baxter County and is in very comfortable circumstances. He takes quite an active part in politics and is a Republican. He was in the Confederate army during the war, was a commissioned officer and was taken prisoner, remaining in prison for some time. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to County Line Lodge No. 373, and also the Chapter at Mountain Home.

Thomas Hall has been a resident of Fulton County, Ark., for the past nineteen years, and his example of industry, and his earnest and sincere efforts to make life a success, are well worthy the imitation of all. The condition of his farm, which consists of 280 acres, shows the thrift and energy which are among his chief characteristics, and all necessary buildings and fences form a prominent feature of the improvements. Thomas Hall was born in Morgan County, Tenn., February 25, 1849, and is one of eight surviving members of a family of eleven children, born to Elijah and Lydia (Scott) Hall, who were born in Morgan County, Tenn., and Kentucky, in 1797 and 1812, respectively. Elijah Hall was a farmer by occupation, and about 1870 moved to Fulton County, Ark., where he passed the rest of his days, dying in 1881. His widow still survives him, and resides in Barter County, Ark. The paternal grandparents were North Carolinians, who removed to Tennessee at an early day, and there died. The youthful days of Thomas Hall were divided between farm work and attending the common schools, where he received a fair education only. He remained with his parents until he attained his majority, and was then married August 14, 1870, to Miss Dorcas E. Kerr, who was born in Tennessee October 30, 1850, and is a daughter of William and Jane Kerr, [p.284] both natives of Ireland, who died in Fulton County, Ark. To Thomas Hall and his wife eight children have been born, six of whom are living: Katie, born August 3, 1872; Clory Ann, born January 26, 1875; Mary Alice, born May 20, 1877; John L., born May 13, 1879, died January 13, 1880; Ada Gordan, born April 21, 1881; Myrtle Eva, born October 30, 1883; Sabra Dorcas, born October 9, 1886, and Victor Thomas, born August 13, 1889. Mr. Hall has always voted the Democratic ticket, and his first vote was cast for Horace Greeley for the Presidency. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and his wife is connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. They are intelligent and enterprising citizens, and would give life to any community in which they might settle.

W. S. Hamilton. A history of any community, large or small, is made up, to a greater or less degree, of the lives of its citizens, and it is apparent to any intelligent observer that the history of this county is only such as has been made by those who have been identified with its development for some time. Mr. Hamilton can safely be classed among the pioneers of the State of Arkansas. His father, Thomas Hamilton, was a native of Ohio, born in 1822, and came to Kentucky at an early day. He was a miller by trade, and followed this pursuit during the principal part of his life. He was married in Kentucky, in 1846, to Miss Sarah Bunton, a native of Virginia, born about 1828. Eight children were given them, five of whom are now living: W. S., John W., David, farmer in the Indian Nation; William, resides in Independence County, Ark., and is a farmer; and Melissa, wife of John M. McCandlass, a farmer of Fulton County. Thomas Hamilton left Kentucky in 1856, and moved to Illinois, where he resided until 1869, but subsequently be located in Greene County, Ark. After remaining there two years he moved to Fulton County, Ark., and engaged in the milling business at Elizabeth, where he remained thus occupied until his death, which occurred on the 20th of October, 1887. He had been justice of the peace of his township in this county for some time, and was a man universally respected. He and wife were both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The mother died March 3, 1861. W. S. Hamilton came to this county with his father, and settled on Spring River, in the east portion for some six years. He then moved to his present property of 160 acres, eighty acres under cultivation, and there he has since remained. He has made all the improvements, and has a fine farm. His marriage occurred in 1868, in Illinois, to Miss Mary A. Green, a native of Tennessee, and to them have been born ten children, nine now living: Sarah E. (deceased), Philip T., born April 7, 1871; N. J., born on the 22d of July, 1873; Melissa, born January 22, 1876; Emily F., born on the 7th of November, 1878; George W., born on the 17th of March, 1880; Nancy E., born on the 22d of June, 1882; H. W. and Letha A. (twins), born on the 6th of November, 1885; and Susan M., born on the 23d of April, 1888. Mrs. Hamilton is the daughter of Thomas and Mary A. Green, natives of Tennessee, who were the parents of two children: Mary A., born on the 12th of January, 1852, and Philip, who resides in Illinois. Mr. Green died in 1852, and in 1855 his widow married Thomas Nipper, by whom she had these children: Sarah J. (deceased), Emily C. (deceased), J. H., and Thomas (deceased). Mr. Nipper died in 1865, of smallpox, and all the children, but the two mentioned above, died of the same dread disease. Mr. Nipper was in the Union army, but was so disabled from exposure that he was discharged about 1863. Mr. Hamilton has filled the office of constable, has also been justice of the peace, and, like his father, is a Democrat in politics. He is a member of Lodge No. 94, of the I. O. O. F., at Vidette, Ark., and has served as secretary and treasurer, and also vice grand of his lodge.

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Sidney K. Harkleroad. The subject of this sketch is a Tennesseean by birth and bringing up, and has inculcated in him the sterling principles of his German ancestors. He was born in Sullivan County, Tenn., March 13, 1848, and is a son of Henry and Margaret Adaline (Berry) Harkleroad, who were born in East Tennessee and Virginia, respectively, and both died in Fulton County, Ark., the former on the 18th of December, 1869, [p.285] at the age of eighty-one years, and the latter on the 18th of November, 1888, aged seventy-one years. They were married in the mother's native State, but resided in Sullivan County, Tenn., until coming to Arkansas in 1850. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he was a soldier in the War of 1812, and by occupation was a blacksmith, carpenter, and farmer, as such being very successful until coming to Arkansas. At his death he left a competency for his family. He was a son of Henry Harkleroad, a native German, who was one of the first settlers of the State of Tennessee, and died there. Five sons and one daughter were born to the latter, five of the family now living: W. H. C., a farmer of Union Township, James H., Joseph T. and S. K., being also millers of that township, and Margaret E., wife of R. C. Byrum of Union Township. W. H. C. was in the Confederate army three years during the Rebellion, and participated in many battles, and James H. was also in the service a short time. The latter, with our subject and his brother, J. T., were extensively engaged in the saw-mill business in Izard County for about eighteen years. In 1888 Sidney K. Harkleroad built a grist mill and cotton-gin on his farm, which he has since been successfully operating, the work which he turns out proving unusually satisfactory, and the patronage that has been attracted to this place for milling purposes is steadily increasing. If close application and study of the wants of his customers will serve to make a permanent success of this mill, then Mr. Harkleroad need have no fear as to the outcome of his venture. He endeavors to please and keep apace with other institutions of like nature, and the results are proving very favorable. In connection with his mill and farming, he and his brother, James H., are engaged in operating a tan yard which is the only business of the kind in Fulton County. Sarah R. Berry, a native of East Tennessee, and a daughter of Thomas Berry, became his wife in 1870, and their union has resulted in the birth of five children: Margaret A., Thomas H., James M., Julia E. and Elmer C. Mr. Harkleroad and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in which he is trustee and class leader. Both he and his brother, James H., are members of the Masonic fraternity, and are Democrats in their political views.

Dr. James Monroe Hazlewood was born in Williamson County, Tenn., October 15, 1837, and is the only surviving one of two children of Thomas and Sarah (Sutton) Hazlewood, the former born in Virginia March 15, 1807, and the latter in the same State February 14, 1814. Thomas Hazlewood was taken to Tennessee at an early day by his father, who also bore the name of Thomas, and there spent his life, engaged in farming, his death occurring October 7, 1838, followed by his wife November 3, 1887, she being an earnest member of the Christian Church. Our subject, Dr. Hazlewood, inherits English and Irish blood from his father. In 1842 he was taken by his parents to Mississippi, and until 1847 they resided near the city of Jackson, then moving to Hardin County, Tenn., and in 1852 to Perry County. In 1860 Dr. Hazlewood emigrated to Dunklin County, Mo., and in 1870 to Oregon County, of the same State, and in 1871 he again made a change of residence, this time coming to Sharp County, Ark., and three years later to where he now lives. His lands amount to 215 acres, and he has about sixty acres under cultivation. His marriage to Miss Martha J. Lindsey took place August 16, 1855. She was born in Tennessee May 4, 1837, and is a daughter of John and Sarah Lindsey, who removed to Arkansas during the early history of that State, and there died. Dr. and Mrs. Hazlewood became the parents of eleven children, of whom the following are living: Mary J. (wife of John A. Michael), Margaret M. (wife of C. C. Allen), Martha T. C., Julia I. V., Samuel J. S. and John S. D. The Doctor has been an ordained minister of the Christian Church since 1884, and has been a practicing physician since 1874. During the war he served six months as lieutenant of Company B, Richardson's artillery. His first presidential vote was cast for John Bell, of Tennessee. He is a Master Mason.

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Joseph Highfill has given his attention strictly to farming throughout life, and his earnest endeavors in pursuing this calling, coupled with strict integrity and honesty of purpose, have placed him among the honored and respected agriculturists of the county. He was born in Tennessee in 1839, and is a son of Dr. James and Martha (Jackson) Highfill, who were born in Tennessee in 1812 and 1825, and died in Oregon County, Mo., and Jackson County, Ark., in 1878 and 1874, respectively. The father was of English lineage, and was a well-known and skillful physician. He also followed the occupation of farming, and in this connection as well as in the capacity of a physician, he attained prominence. Bennett and Margaret Highfill emigrated from Tennessee to Dallas County, Mo., in 1854, and five years later moved to Oregon County. The grandfather Bennett died in Tennessee, and his wife in Dallas County, Mo. Joseph Highfill was the fourth of fourteen children, and made his home with his parents until twenty-two years of age, receiving during his youth a very limited education. In 1880 he removed from Oregon County, Mo., to where he now lives, and is the owner of a good farm, comprising 120 acres, with about forty acres under cultivation. During the Rebellion he spent some eight months in the Confederate army, but has since been a Republican in politics. Miss Mary Kirby, who was born in Tennessee, in 1843, became his wife in 1863, and by her he has had a family of five children: Jennie, Rosa, Ellen, Alice and Hattie. They are also rearing an orphan child named Maud Koontz. Mrs. Highfill is a daughter of Henry and Temperance Kirby, the former born in the State of Tennessee, and the latter in North Carolina. They moved from Tennessee to Illinois in 1851, and in 1859 located in Oregon County, Mo., where they both died. Mrs. Highfill belongs to the Christian Church.

Sell W. Hinkle, farmer, is now following the occupation to which he was reared, and which has been his life work, a calling that for ages has received undivided efforts from many worthy individuals, and one that furnishes sustenance to the ready worker. His parents, Jesse and Annie (Hopkins) Hinkle, were both natives of North Carolina, and at an early day came to Arkansas. They purchased a farm in Oil Trough Bottom, and made a great many improvements on it. Mr. Hinkle's first marriage occurred in 1825 or 1826 in North Carolina, and this union was blessed by the birth of these children: Wes (deceased), Jesse (deceased), Narcissus, Artemus and Louisa. Mrs. Hinkle died about 1852, and Mr. Hinkle took for his second wife, two years later, Miss Fannie Hopkins, who bore him two children: Sell and Sarah J. (deceased). Mr. Hinkle died near 1858, and his widow followed him to the grave the next year. Sell Hinkle began working for himself at the age of nineteen as a farm hand, and this continued until twenty years of age. He then chose Miss Lucy Lee, of Leon County, Texas, as his companion through life, and they were married in 1878. Mr. Hinkle continued to farm in Oil Trough Bottom until 1884, when he moved to Fulton County and bought 160 acres of land. He erected good buildings and made many other improvements, and still owns eighty acres in Oil Trough Bottom, all well-improved and worth $50 per acre. Mrs. Hinkle is the daughter of Thomas and Jane (Merriman) Lee, and one of two children: Lucy, born November 10, 1861, and Sarah, wife of Mr. James, living in Fulton County. Mr. Lee died in 1865 from the effect of injuries received in a collision on the train. He served in the Confederate army as a private. Mrs. Lee was married the second time in 1870 to Wesley Thompson, and by him became the mother of five children: George and Mollie (twins), Elijah, Carroll and Alice. Mrs. Thompson died in 1880, and Mr. Thompson five years later. He was a farmer in Jackson County, Ark., and was one of the well-to-do farmers. Mr. Hinkle received a very meager education, but is a liberal supporter of public schools, etc. He is a Democrat in politics. Mrs. Hinkle is a member of the Christian Church. He belongs to the I. O. O. F.

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William Howard is one of the sturdy and progressive tillers of the soil of Fulton County, Ark., and a man who has won a host of warm friends by his many admirable traits of character. He was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., August 15, 1823, and is a son of Robert and Susan (Smith) Howard. The father died in Wayne County, Mo., [p.287] when our subject was about thirteen years of age, and the date of his birth is unknown. He removed from Alabama to Missouri in 1826, and was of Irish descent, his grandfather having been born in the "Emerald Isle." His wife was supposed to have been born in Alabama in 1805, and died in Jackson County, Ark., in 1862. Two of her nine children are now living, of whom our subject is the eldest. He attended the common schools of Wayne County, Mo., and until twenty-two years of age remained faithfully by his mother, assisting her in making a living. In March, 1844, he moved to Jackson County, Ark., and was married there in May two years later to Miss Caroline Kinder, who was born in Cape Girardeau County, Mo., in 1828. She died in her native county in 1851, having become the mother of two children, both of whom are deceased. On February 22, 1858, he married Mrs. Elizabeth (Breckenridge) Dennis, who was born in Alabama in 1826. Of the seven children born to them only one is now living: William, who was born June 14, 1854, is living with his parents and is married to Susan Mullens. They have two children: Robert L. and Walter C. Mr. and Mrs. Howard are members of the Baptist Church. In 1863 Mr. Howard enlisted in Company E, Clark's regiment. and served until the final surrender, the latter part of his service being under Marmaduke. He was also with Price on his-raid and served as second lieutenant. Since about 1844 he has been a resident of Arkansas and in his political views has always been a Democrat, having cast his first presidential vote for James K. Polk.

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Dr. D. T. Hudgens, of Elizabeth. Ark., has been successful as both druggist and practicing physician, and is one of the prominent business men of the place. He was born in Pulaski County, Mo., March 27, 1850, and received his rudimentary education in the common schools, supplementing the same by a two years' course in the high school at Rolls. When about twenty years of age he engaged in farming, and two years later entered the ministry, being licensed in August, 1872. He was a traveling preacher for five years and held all the offices in the Free Will Baptist Church. He has been an ordained elder since 1872 and occasionally occupies the pulpit now, thus administering to the spiritual wants of his fellow man as well as to their physical needs. He is popular with all, kind and courteous in his intercourse with his acquaintances, and is always to the front in aiding any enterprise which tends to the advancement of the county. In December, 1869, he selected a wife in the person of Miss Martha Ousley, a native of Osage County, Mo., and the daughter of William and Martha Ousley, the father one of the wealthiest farmers of Pulaski County, Mo. This union resulted in the birth of five children, one son and three daughters living. While practicing he was studying medicine in Pulaski County, and in 1878 he came to Fulton County and was the first settler at Elizabeth, becoming one of the most successful and prominent physicians of the county. When first entering upon the practice of his profession he was in poor circumstances, but his true worth soon became apparent and a large patronage was the result. He never attended medical college, but in 1882 he passed the best examination before the medical examiners of any physician in Fulton County. For three years he has been in the drug business in connection with his practice. He was the first postmaster at Elizabeth and held the position for several years. A Democrat in his political preferences, his first presidential vote was cast for Tilden in 1876. He was a charter member of Wild Cherry Lodge No. 443, A. F. & A. M., and has held nearly all the offices. He is also a member of Eastern Star Chapter, at Wild Cherry. His wife has been a member of the church for many years, and he has been a member since 1869. His parents, Robert and Mahala C. (Dodd) Hudgens, were born in Kentucky and Tennessee, respectively. They were married in Missouri, where they were early settlers, and there the father was a successful attorney for twenty years. He died in Rolla in October, 1864, and at the time of his death was one of the leading lawyers of Southern Missouri, then holding, also, the position of provost marshal. He was also treasurer of Pulaski County at one time. After his death his widow married again and moved to Elizabeth, where she died in [p.288] 1885. She was a member of the Baptist Church for seventeen years.

Jacob T. Hudson is a man whose natural characteristics have especially favored as a tiller of the soil. The pursuit of agriculture has afforded him high gratification, and in the conduct of a farm the principles which he has held have been peculiarly adapted to the successful development and improvement of the varied elements of farm life. Of unquestioned honesty and integrity, his course through life has been unimpaired by criticism. Mr. Hudson was born in Itawamba County, Miss., in 1850, and is the son of William P. and Celia (Thomas) Hudson, the former a native of Anson County, N. C., born July 8, 1808, and the latter of Darlington District, S. C. They were wedded in the last named place, and from there removed to Pickens County, Ala., in 1845 or 1846, and from there soon after to Itawamba County, Miss. In 1870 they moved to Fulton County, Ark., and there Mr. Hudson died in 1871. He was a well-to-do farmer, and was of Dutch extraction. His wife died in Tennessee about 1884, and both were members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Like most of the youths of that vicinity, as he grew up, he devoted his time and attention to farming, receiving in the meantime a rather limited amount of schooling. In 1869 he came with his brother-in-law to Fulton County, and was engaged in farm labor until 1873, when he was united in marriage to Miss Martha E., daughter of Josiah and Matilda Ross, natives of Tennessee and Kentucky, respectively. Mr. Ross died in Fulton County, but his wife is still living. Mrs. Hudson was born in Izard County, and by her union to Mr. Hudson became the mother of six children, one son and three daughters living. Since 1878 Mr. Hudson has lived on his present farm of 175 acres, with sixty-five or seventy under cultivation. All this is his own work, as there were but twelve acres cleared when he first settled there. He is a Republican in his political views, and his first presidential vote was for Gen. Grant in 1872. He has been a member of Lodge No. 443, A. F. & A. M., at Wild Cherry, and has held nearly all the offices except Master. He is also a member of Ladies Chapter of Eastern Star (White Lily) No. 61. at Wild Cherry, and is a charter member of both lodges, He and wife belong to the Missionary Baptist Church, and he is clerk in the Mount Vernon and Pleasant Ridge Church. One brother. E. D., and two sisters, Mrs. Elizabeth Wallace and Mrs. Argen D. Harris, are residing in Fulton County, while one brother. John A., is in Alabama, and two sisters, Mrs. Mary P. Mayhall and Mrs. Betsey A. Mayhall, are both natives of Mississippi.

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Dr. John S. Hutchenson, physician and surgeon, Wild Cherry. Among the people of Fulton as well as surrounding counties the name that heads this sketch is by no means an unfamiliar one, for for many years he has been active and successfully occupied in the prosecution of his chosen profession, and during that time his career as a practitioner and thorough student of medicine has won for him no less a reputation than did his personal characteristics as a citizen and neighbor. He owes his nativity to Carroll County, Ark., where he was born in 1854. His parents. John W. and Mary (Sudduth) Hutchenson, the former a native of Alabama, and the latter of South Carolina, were married in Mississippi, about 1850, later removing to Carroll County, Ark., and four years after to Fulton County, of the same State. They settled on the farm where the Doctor is now living, and in 1855 the father went to Kansas and was absent about four months in search for gold. He was a farmer, but also followed merchandising at Wild Cherry. There he died in 1858 in full communion with the Christian Church. Mrs. Hutchenson was married twice. Mr. Hutchenson being her last husband. She has been living on the old home place since 1854, and is one of the old settlers in Big Creek Township. She has been a member of the Christian Church for many years. Dr. John S. Hutchenson was the third of four sons; and his education was acquired in the common schools. When sixteen years of age he began the study of medicine and in 1878 and 1879 attended Keokuk Medical College, at Keokuk, Iowa, and has since practiced his profession in the locality in which he was reared. January 2, 1874, Miss Mary Trap, originally from Tennessee, became his [p.289] wife. She was an orphan, was reared in Missouri, and died on September 20, 1876, leaving one son. She was a member in good standing in the Methodist Episcopal Church. Dr, Hutchenson owns the home farm of 520 acres, with 225 under cultivation. He is the only child living of his father's family. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party, and cast his first presidential vote for S. J. Tilden in 1876.

P. P. B. Hynson of the general mercantile firm of Archer, Daniel & Co. of Mammoth Spring, Ark., was born in Batesville, Independence County, in 1851, his parents being William and Rosalie (Burton) Hynson, the former of Maryland by birth and rearing. In 1838 he came to Arkansas, and located at Batesville, where he married in 1842, and resided until his death in 1858, at the age of forty-three years. His family came from England and settled upon the eastern shore of Maryland. His wife was born in Virginia, and now resides in Batesville, having become the mother of four children. The maternal grandfather, P. P. Burton, was a native of Virginia, and was a successful physician; he graduated from a medical college at Philadelphia, and first practiced his profession at Lexington, Va., then at Holly Springs, Miss., and finally located in Little Rock, Ark., in 1840. He was a practicing physician for sixty years, and was United States surgeon at Little Rock for many years. His death occurred in 1872 at the age of eighty-five years. The great grandfather was a Scotchman, who moved from his native land to the colonies at an early day, and during the progress of the Revolutionary War served in the Continental army in the rank of major. He was donated 4,000 acres of land by the Government for valuable services. P. P. B. Hynson was educated in Batesville, Ark., and began life for himself as a clerk in a general mercantile store in that town at the age of sixteen years, continuing until 1871 when he became a member of the firm, remaining as such until 1873. Since 1876 he has been a resident of Fulton County, Ark., and has been associated with his present partners. They carry a stock of goods valued at about $22,000. Mr. Hynson is president and a stockholder of the Mammoth Spring Fish Farm, is a director in the Motor Light & Water Company and is a director of the Building & Loan Association, all of these companies being incorporated. He was married in 1879 to Miss Mollie McKee, of Owensboro, Ky., and their union has resulted in the birth of four children: Robert T., Rosalie B., Lawrence M. and Selden L. Mr. Hynson is a Democrat. His grandmother was a Scott, a relative of Gen. Scott.

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William M. Lafevers, farmer, Viola. No worthy reference to the affairs of this county would be complete without mention of Mr. Lafevers, who, among others, is engaged in tilling the soil. Besides enjoying to an unlimited extent the confidence and respect of all who know him he came of a family of children that have not only done credit to themselves but have brought honor upon the name they bear. Mr. Lafevers' parents, Alexander and Rebecca (Bradley) Lafevers, were both natives of North Carolina, the father born in Burke County and the mother in Cherokee County. They moved to Hardin County, Tenn., in 1871, to Izard County, Ark., about 1876, and to Fulton County in 1878, where Mrs. Lafevers died in 1883. The father is still living, and is sixty-four years of age. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, as was also his wife. He is a farmer by occupation and served in both the Mexican and Civil Wars. Of the ten children born to his marriage seven are still living, and all but one in Fulton County. William M. Lafevers is the eldest child of this family. He was born in Cherokee County, N. C., in 1852, and though his educational advantages in youth were very meager, and though perhaps deficient in general learning, his vigorous mind has so grasped and embraced the opportunities which have presented themselves that he is accounted among the intelligent men of this vicinity. He was from the first taught everything connected with farming, later moving with his parents to Izard County. In 1875 he wedded Miss Tennessee Cole, daughter of Henry and Mary Cole, early settlers of Arkansas, and the same year of his marriage he moved to Fulton County. He is the owner of 207 acres of land, with 100 under cultivation, and also has other interests. He is a Democrat in [p.290] politics, casting his first vote for Tilden; is a member of the Agricultural Wheel, and he and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

William Thomas Livingston. The many years passed in sincere and earnest endeavor in thoroughly discharging every duty in the different branches of business to which his attention has been directed, have contributed very materially to the success that has fallen to the career of Mr. L. He was born in Chambers County, Ala., May 14, 1835, and is a son of James T. and Emma W. (Childs) Livingston, who were born in Abbeville District, S. C., in 1803 and 1810, and died in Fulton County, Ark., July 7, 1859, and in 1864, respectively. Their marriage took place in their native district in 1830, and about three years later they moved to Chambers County, Ala., and in 1850 to Cass County, Ga. (now known as Bartow County), where they made their home until the fall of 1856. Then they came to Arkansas and located in Fulton County, the country at that time being in a very wild and unsettled condition and the homes of the settlers few and far between. Mr. Livingston engaged in farming and milling, and was successful in the former occupation, but in the latter his efforts were not attended with good results. He served in the Creek War for a short time, and while in Alabama and Georgia held the office of justice of the peace at different times, and at the time of his death in this State he was county surveyor of Fulton County. He acquired an excellent education by experience as a salesman in a mercantile establishment in Old Cambridge, S. C., and afterward became a partner in the business. He was a son of Thomas Livingston, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, being at the battle of Horse Shoe Bend. He died in Abbeville District, S. C. William Thomas Livingston, our immediate subject, was the second of eight children, six of whom survive, and acquired his education in the common schools of Alabama and Georgia. He remained faithfully by his parents until their deaths, and assisted his father in managing the home place. In 1858 he was appointed deputy sheriff under Thomas E. Martin, serving two years, then farmed until May, 1862, at which time he enlisted in the Confederate army, in the Tenth Missouri Infantry, and served as forage and wagon-master until starting for home the day before Lee surrendered. April 8, 1865, with a discharge by reason of his election as representative of his county. After his return home he again took up the implements of farm life, was appointed deputy sheriff of Fulton County and in 1866 again appointed to the same position under M. V. Shaver, and again in 1867 under E. O. Wolf. In 1872, at the close of reconstruction, he was elected sheriff, again in 1876 and 1878. then in 1882, and once more in 1886, in all ten years –a longer term of office than has ever been held by any one man in the county, with the exception of W. P. Rhea, who was circuit court clerk for the same length of time. He was assessor of Fulton County in 1859, 1867 and 1868; and in 1864. while in the army was elected to represent Fulton County in the General Assembly. In 1867 his union with Miss Louesa L. Jenkins took place, and by her he became the father of eleven children, seven of whom are living: James T., William S., Mary T., Emma J., Carrie M., Cora A. and Daisy B. Mr. Livingston is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, is a Democrat in his political views, and has shown his brotherly spirit by becoming a member of the Masonic fraternity, representing his lodge in the Grand Lodge in 1873.

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Hon. E. R. Lucas, farmer. Viola. No name is justly entitled to a more enviable place in the history of Fulton County than the one which heads this sketch, for it is borne by a man who has been usefully and honorably identified with the interests of this county, and with its advancement, in every worthy particular. He owes his nativity to Dallas County, Ala., where he was born in 1835. His parents, Harvey B. and Amy (Wilson) Lucas, were born in Kentucky, in 1808, and Georgia, in 1810, respectively. The father went to New York City when twenty-one years of age, engaged in merchandising, but was burned out in the fire of 1833. After this he went to Alabama, was married there, and began the study of medicine. He practiced in that State for some time, then graduated in his profession at Cincinnati, Ohio, after [p.291] which, his health being very poor, he was advised to go to Europe, but died on the ocean, in 1844 or 1845, leaving a wife and four children, in poor circumstances. He was of Scotch descent, was a member of the Baptist Church, also a Mason, and was a very promising man. His widow is still living, and has been a member of the Baptist Church for over sixty years. She reared four children, Hon. E. R. being the eldest. He received very little education until grown, and then taught seven terms of school. His wife was formerly Miss Nancy Radford, whom he married in 1859. Her parents, Reuben and Sarah Radford, were natives, respectively, of Alabama and Kentucky, and passed their last days in the former State, Mrs. Radford dying in 1853, and Mr. Radford some years previous. To Mr. and Mrs. Lucas were born ten children, three sons and four daughters living. Mr. Lucas served through the war, having enlisted in Company K, Eleventh Alabama Volunteer Infanty, Confederate Army; the first year he was a private, then third lieutenant, and afterward first lieutenant, and finally captain. He operated in Northern Virginia with Gen. Lee, and was in twenty-four general engagements, among them Seven Pines, seven days' fight before Richmond, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spottsylvania, etc., and was never captured nor wounded. He received a furlough, and was at home during the final surrender. He then returned to tilling the soil, and in 1869 came to Fulton County, Ark., where he has since lived, residing on his present farm for the past six years. He has been a close student all his life, and is at present one of the best informed men in Fulton County. In 1874 he was a member of the constitutional convention that framed the present constitution of Arkansas, and in 1882 was elected to represent the county mentioned in the State legislature, holding the position for two years. He has been a life-long Democrat, and his first presidential vote was for James Buchanan, in 1856. He has been a Mason since 1861, now belonging to Viola Lodge No. 399, and has held nearly all the offices, and was Master two years. He is also a member of the Agricultural Wheel. He and wife belong to the Missionary Baptist Church, in which he has been a deacon for a number of years. His maternal grandfather, William Wilson, was a native Virginian, and died in Georgia. He was of English descent, and a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Lucas has one brother, Rev. Oscar M. Lucas, who has been a prominent Baptist minister for about twenty-five years. He was educated principally at Mountain Home, in Baxter County. William P., another brother, served about fourteen months in the Confederate army, and was wounded at the seven days' battle, in June, 1862, and died from the effects July 9, of the same year. A sister, Sarah F., is the wife of William P. Cameron, and is also a member of the Baptist Church.

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Elder Joseph B. McGlasson, minister of the Christian Church, and farmer of Big Creek Township, was born in Cumberland County, Ky., in 1809, and is at present one of the oldest and most esteemed citizens of Fulton County. His early life was one of hardship and trouble, and at that day he received very limited educational advantages, the most of his education being acquired after attaining his majority. Previous to that he had left home under rather unpleasant circumstances, his father being quite dissipated, and ragged and bare-foot, and with little or no schooling, he was compelled to make his way in life. He worked for a man one day to get some leather, and for another man a short time to get the leather made up into a pair of shoes. He continued to labor at such occupation as he could find, until he had a good suit of clothes, after which he attended school, etc. He was married September 16, 1830, to Miss Fannie Ross, who was originally from Cumberland County, Ky., and who died in Fulton County, Ark., in 1858. Eleven children were born to this marriage, six sons and five daughters, only four of whom are now living viz.: Isabelle S., Susan, wife of William L. Cavnett, of Phelps County, Mo.; Jane and Fannie. Mr. McGlasson's second marriage occurred, in 1859, to Mrs. Margaret J. Nibblett, daughter of William and Lucy Fewell. She was born in Alabama, and by her marriage became the mother of four children, two now living: Francis M. and Tabitha, wife of James James, of Randolph County, Ark. The second Mrs. McGlasson died about 1877, and Mr. McGlasson then married Mrs. Nancy Hewitt, who died in 1883. In August of the following year he married Mrs. Elizabeth Watson, daughter of James Hammond, and a native of Graves County, Ky. She was previously a member of the Baptist Church, but for the last seven years has been a member of the Christian Church. In 1836 Mr. McGlasson removed to Southwest Arkansas, where he remained until 1851, then locating in Izard County, and from there, one year later, in Fulton County, Ark. He settled in the neighborhood where he now lives, and was one of the first white settlers of the county, he being only one of two now living in Big Creek Township who were in that township at that time. He has long been recognized as an honest, upright and much esteemed citizen, and one of the county's leading farmers. He now has 148 acres of land, with some sixty acres under cultivation. For about fifty-sight years he has been a Christian, first a member of the Methodist Church, and in 1845 he was licensed to preach by that church. He has preached more or less ever since, and is among the oldest ministers of Arkansas. He was a Methodist until the separation in 1845, and was then a Protestant Methodist until the war. He then remained out of the church until 1865, when he joined the Christian Church. From 1844 to 1850 he was justice of the peace, and filled this position for four years in Fulton County. He was drummer for four years in the militia in Kentucky, and was lieutenant of a volunteer company in the year 1845. In politics he has been a Democrat all his life, and his first presidential vote was cast for Andrew Jackson, in 1828. He is a member of Wild Cherry Lodge No. 85, I. O. O. F. Mr. McGlasson is the son of James and Susannah (Harley) McGlasson, natives of Virginia, born in Franklin and Bedford Counties, respectively. The parents were married in their native State, in 1807, and removed to Cumberland County, Ky., locating in the woods, and were among the very earliest settlers. There they spent their entire lives, the mother dying since the war, at the age of ninety-seven years. She was a member of the Baptist Church for many years. The father was a good farmer. They were the parents of eleven children. Matt McGlasson, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a native of Scotland, and came to America when quite young. He enlisted in the Revolutionary War when only eighteen years of age, and was in service during the entire war. He located first in Virginia, but later moved to Kentucky, where he passed his last days. He was one of the first settlers. His wife, Elizabeth Cunningham, was born in France. Mathew McGlasson, the great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, spent his entire life in Scotland. The maternal grandfather, Francis Harley, was of Dutch descent, and died in Virginia.

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Azriah W. McKenzie. The career of Mr. McKenzie presents an example of industry. perseverance and good management, rewarded by substantial results, well worthy the imitation of all who start out in life as he did with no capital except a good constitution and liberal supply of pluck and energy. He is numbered among those of Georgia nativity now in Fulton County, having been born in that State on the 7th of November, 1831. John McKenzie, his father, was a Georgian, born about 1800, and first settled in the wilds of Lawrence County, Ark., in 1848. He pursued the occupation of farming until his death at the age of sixty-five years. After residing in Lawrence County a few years he moved to Madison County, thence to Missouri, and finally returned to his son's (Azriah) home in 1862. He was a soldier in the Florida and Indian War. His father was born in Scotland, and came to the United States at the time of the Revolutionary War. Our subject's mother was a Miss Jane Canady, who was born in Georgia, about 1801. and died in Lawrence County, Ark. (now Sharp County), in 1851. She was the mother of seven sons and four daughters, all of whom grew to mature years, and two of whom are now living: Azriah and a sister, both of whom live in Fulton County. The former was the sixth of the family, and remained with his parents until about eighteen years of age, when he started [p.293] for California, which State he reached in the summer of 1852. He remained there engaged in mining until December, 1857, then returned to Arkansas, where he continued until the spring of 1859, when he again crossed the plains, and for two years was occupied in cattle dealing in California. In the last named year he again returned home, and in July of that year enlisted in the Confederate army, being under Capt. Wyatt, and served until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner at Big Blue while with Price on his raid, and was retained at Alton, Ill., for four months, after which he was paroled. He then rejoined his company in the south part of Arkansas, and at the close of hostilities returned home and resumed his farming operations. He has a fine farm of 400 acres, with 185 under cultivation, which he has acquired by hard work and good management. His first vote for the presidency was cast for Franklin Pierce, and he has always been a Democrat. He is unmarried.

Dr. Joel McLemore, a physician of acknowledged merit in Fulton County, was born in Halifax County, N. C., June 12, 1835, and there remained until ten years of age, when he was taken by his mother to Tennessee, receiving his literary education in Waynesboro, of that State. During this time he formed a strong desire to study medicine and made the investigation of this science his chief business for a number of years. He has been practicing since 1865, and has been a successful practitioner of Fulton County ever since 1878. In October, 1855, he was married in Tennessee to Miss Harriet G. McClearen, who was born and reared in Hickman County, Middle Tenn. Her parents, John and Elzada (Adams) McClearen, were born in Northern Alabama and Bedford County, Tenn., respectively. To Dr. and Mrs. McLemore nine children have been given, seven of whom are living: John B., Joel H. (deceased), James F., William B., Albert A., Sterling P., Samuel G., an infant deceased, and Allie. During the late war the Doctor served four years in the Confederate army as major of a battalion. He is a Master Mason, a member of the Democratic party, and he and wife belong to the Methodist Protestant Church. He owns a farm of 240 acres on English Creek, about seventy-five acres of which are under cultivation. His parents, Joel and Mrs. Elizabeth (Pullen) McLemore, were born in Virginia and North Carolina in May, 1773, and 1803, respectively. The father removed to North Carolina when a young man and was married there. He was a tailor by trade, and also followed the occupation of farming, and on his extensive plantation in Halifax County employed 100 hands. He was twice married, Miss Pullen being his second wife, and by her he became the father of two sons: Joel, and James H., who lives in Wayne County., Tenn. After his demise his widow married John Whittaker, and moved to Perry County, Tenn., where she died in April, 1859. The paternal grandparents of our subject were born near London, England, and a short time prior to the Revolutionary War they emigrated to the United States and settled near Richmond, Va., where they afterward died. The grandfather served as major in the Continental army during that war.

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Jesse Matthews is a newspaper man of long experience, his connection with his present paper dating from January 8, 1879. Under his able management it has become recognized as a journal of decided merit, its editorials being written with a clearness and force which indicate a writer of ability, while it has become very popular for its hold and fearless advocacy of measures which it deems will prove of benefit to this section. His parents, Jesse and Mary (Houston) Matthews, were born in Baltimore, Md., and Paris, Bourbon County, Ky., respectively, the former being reared to manhood in his native town; then he came west and settled at Glasgow, Mo., in which place he engaged in merchant tailoring, and followed this occupation for some time. In 1849 he went to California, where he spent eight years in gold digging, accumulating considerable money. After his return to Missouri he located at Huntsville, where his worthy wife departed this life, after which he removed to the northwest county in Missouri, where he is spending his declining years with a son. The paternal grandfather was an early emigrant to [p.294] America, and was of Scotch ancestry although born in the "Emerald Isle." Jesse Matthews, the immediate subject of this sketch, was reared at Huntsville, Randolph County, Mo., but was favored with only poor advantages for obtaining an education, which he improved by entering a printing office when fourteen years of age, only going to school two ten months' sessions. In 1874 he was married to Miss Sarah E. Rider, who was born in Pulaski County, Mo., in 1856, and six children blessed their union: Maggie A., Edgar M., Elmer H., Mattie, Jessie P., Earnest L. and Emmett G. Mr. Matthews learned the printer's trade in his youth at Huntsville, Mo., commencing his apprenticeship in July, 1864, and serving five years. He then went to Kansas City, and worked on the "Kansas City Times" as a compositor for one year, and the following year worked on the "Oswego (Kansas) Register." He next made a short stay in Arkansas, after which he went back to Missouri, and for four years worked at Salem on "The Success," as foreman. He next went to Pulaski County where he bought a printer's outfit, and moved to Gainesville, establishing the "Gainesville Gazette," afterward removing to Licking, where he established the "Ledger," which he conducted one year, then starting the "Spirit," at Salem, Mo. Since January 8, 1879, he has been a resident of Salem, Ark., establishing the "Salem Informer" at the above date, which he has continuously published up to the present time. Mr. Matthews is a conservative Democrat, and his paper is independent. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M., and also a member of the Kansas City Typographical Union.

R. B. Maxey is an attorney of Salem, Ark., who has steadily and surely made his way to the front in the practice of his chosen profession, and as a prominent and useful citizen. He was born in Giles County, Tenn., October 11, 1846, and received his education in Lebanon, Wilson County, Tenn., and while there formed habits of application and industry so essential to any successful career through life, and which stood him in good service when entering upon his legal studies, which he did after wielding the ferule for three years. His legal preceptor was W. F. Henderson, the present supreme judge of New Mexico, who was then attorney-general of Arkansas. He was admitted to the bar of Randolph County, Ark., in March, 1872, and the two following years were spent in practicing his profession at Pocahontas. Mo. From that time until 1878 he resided in Corning, Clay County, Ark., and then on account of ill health, came to Salem, where he has since been engaged in regular practice and the real estate business. He owns considerable land in the county, and some valuable town property. Miss Minnie Jones, who was born in Pocahontas, Randolph County, Mo., became his wife in 1874, and by her he has an interesting family of four children: Ollie, Soula, Kittie and Harry. Mr. Maxey holds a membership in the I. O. O. F. lodge at Pocahontas, and he and his wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Marey's parents, J. H. and Elizabeth (Black) Maxey, were born in the State of Virginia, the former's birth occurring in 1812. He was reared to a farm life in Tennessee, and there married and spent his life, his death occurring in 1871. His wife, who died in 1850, bore him five children. Grandfather Maxey was a Virginian, who emigrated to Tennessee at an early day, and there spent the rest of his days.

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Daniel W. Mitchell, farmer, merchant, and postmaster of Mitchell postoffice, which was established in 881, through his efforts, owes his birth to Marion County, Tenn., where he was born in 1828. His father, Warren W. Mitchell, was a native of North Carolina, born in 1782, and was married in Tennessee to Mrs. Elender Lewis, also a native of North Carolina, and born in the year 1792. The father died in Tennessee in 1842. He was a successful tiller of the soil. His father, John Mitchell, was born and reared in Ireland, but on coming to the United States, settled in North Carolina, and there died. He served all through the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Elender (Lewis) Mitchell was married the first time in North Carolina. After the death of Mr. Mitchell, she removed to North Mississippi, and there died in April, 1857. Her father, Harbored Lewis, was a Welshman, [p.295] and his wife was Dutch. They came to America prior to the Revolutionary War, settling in Chatham County, N. C., and there passed the remainder of their lives. Daniel W., the second of three sons and four daughters born to his parents, received a very limited education, and remained with his mother until grown, taking charge of the family at the age of seventeen. His marriage occurred in 1856 to Miss P. A. Walker, a native of Alabama, and the daughter of John and Mary Walker, who were natives of Tennessee, but who passed the last of their days in Mississippi. Mr. Mitchell lived in Mississippi until during the war, when he moved to Perry County, Ill., after which he returned to Mississippi. In 1870 he came to Fulton County, rented land until 1872, and then settled in the dense woods on his present farm, now of about 600 acres, with 100 acres under cultivation, all the result of his own energy, never having inherited anything. He is at present a prominent farmer, and a successful business man. In 1883 he established a store on his farm, and has carried this on nearly ever since. He was justice of the peace for some years in Mississippi, and also filled that position for about two years in Fulton County. In politics he was reared a Whig, but is now a Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell are members in good standing in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he has been steward in the same for many years.

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Edward S. Nesbit is manager of the Nesbit Lumber Company, of Mammoth Spring, Ark., dealers in dressed and rough lumber, shingles, sash, doors, blinds, lime, cement, laths, hair, etc. This business was established in March, 1889. Mr. Nesbit was born in De Soto County, Miss., in 1838, and is the son of Thomas and Margaret (Driver) Nesbit, natives of South Carolina and Alabama, respectively. When a boy, Thomas Nesbit went to Alabama, where he grew to manhood, married, and soon after removed to Mississippi, being one of the pioneers of that State. He was a wealthy farmer, and died in the last mentioned State in 1885, at the age of seventy-three years. He was the founder of the town of Nesbit, on the Illinois Central Railroad, and one of the most prominent citizens of the locality in which he lived. He and wife were for many years members in good standing in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Thomas Nesbit, grandfather of Edward S. Nesbit, was of Irish parentage, and was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Nesbit died about 1881; she was the daughter of Lewis Driver, who was a wealthy agriculturist, and who died in Alabama. Of the nine children born to his parents, Edward S. Nesbit was the third. He secured a fair education in the common schools until nearly grown, and when nineteen years of age graduated from Wesleyan University at Florence, Ala. He then on gaged in the lumber and saw-mill business on Tallahatchee River, where he remained until the breaking out of the Civil War. He then joined Company K, Ninth Mississippi Volunteer Infantry, and nine months later was appointed lieutenant of a battalion of sharp shooters, serving in that capacity until the close of the war. He was captured in West Mississippi in October, 1862, and was held a prisoner at Fort Pickering for about three months. At the close of the strife he engaged in farming and merchandising, which he carried on for some time. On the 1st of March, 1861, he married Miss Maggie Bradford, a native of Arkansas, and who died in 1866. Her father, Thomas Bradford, was one of the organizers of the Mississippi and Tennessee, now Illinois Central Railroad Company. He was a director and leading factor in that road until his death. To Mr. and Mrs. Nesbit were born four children, two sons and two daughters, all living. Mr. Nesbit's second marriage occurred about 1881, to Mrs. Nancy E. Nesbit, daughter of J. R. Jefferys, a native of Virginia, who died about 1884, in De Soto County, Miss. Mrs. Nesbit was also born in Virginia. Mr. Nesbit lived in his native county until 1884, when he removed to Imboden, and in 1889 to Mammoth Spring. He was in company with his father in the milling, ginning and lumber business, and this continued extensively until he came to Arkansas, and was then connected with the Imboden Milling Company, until 1889. He was mayor of Nesbit, Miss., for a number of years. Politically, he was a Whig until the war, since which time he has been a Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for Bell in 1860. He is a Master Mason and Royal Arch Mason, and also belongs to the K. of H. and K. of L. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and his wife of the Missionary Baptist. Their children are named as follows: Mary E., wife of W. J. Johnson, farmer of De Soto County, Miss.: Edward S., Jr., was educated at Nesbit, Miss., and is a telegraph operator at Imboden; Milton W. received his education at the same place, and is also a telegraph operator at Portia; Maggie E. was educated principally at Pulaski, Tenn. The children received good school advantages.

H. F. Northcutt, one of the most efficient circuit and county clerks Fulton County has ever had, is a young man well known in the community, and has been an incumbent of his present office since the fall of 1886, serving by re-election. In the year 1863 he first saw the light of day in Warren County, Tenn., but was roared in this county, and although he attended the free schools for some time, he is mainly self-educated. After following the monotonous duties of farm life for some time, he abandoned this work to enter the county clerk's office as deputy, continuing as such until he was elected to the office of county assessor, as soon as he was eligible for office, when twenty-one years of age. He continued to discharge the duties of this office in a very satisfactory manner until 1886, at which time he was elected to his present position. In social as well as public life he is kind, courteous and affable in his demeanor to all classes, and is a young man who attracts the regard of all who approach him. He is Democratic in politics, and has shown his approval of secret societies by becoming a member of the I. O. O. F. His wife was formerly Miss Mattie L. Wainwright, whom he married in September, 1885, she having been born in Fulton County, Ark. Mr. Northcutt is a son of J. M. and Mary E. (Doughty) Northcutt, who were born in Warren and Wilson Counties, Tenn., respectively. They were reared, educated and married in their native State, and there made their home until 1868, when they came to Arkansas, locating in Fulton County, at Salem. Mr. Northcutt established a general mercantile store, and did a prosperous business for a number of years, being also quite extensively engaged in stock dealing. At one time he left home to dispose of some stock and was never afterward heard from, but all his baggage was traced to Louisville, Ky., and the supposition is that he was murdered for his money. His widow and two children survive him (two other children having died), the former being a resident of Salem. The paternal grandfather. J. M. Northcutt, was a native German.

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Dr. William B. Phillips is a leading physician and surgeon of Fulton County, Ark., and possesses those sterling qualities which are characteristic of people of Scotch descent, as well as of those who claim Ohio as the State of their birth. He was born in Morgan County. July 24, 1836, and there received good educational advantages, which he did not fail to improve. He removed with his parents from Ohio to Missouri in 1859, and having formed the desire to pursue the study of medicine with a view to making it a profession, he entered the St. Louis Medical College (then called Pope's College), where he acquired an excellent knowledge of that calling. When the matterings of war resounded through the land he entered the service as hospital steward, but afterward became hospital surgeon, and acted in this capacity until the close of the war. After residing in Missouri until 1876 he came to Izard County, Ark., and in 1882 to where he now lives, where his efforts to alleviate the sufferings of the sick have been attended with most pleasing results. His name has become well known throughout the length and breadth of the county as an able practitioner, and his success fully justifies the large and lucrative patronage he has always received. In 1858 he was married to Miss Louisa Valaivies, who was born in Belmont County. Ohio, in 1839, but her death occurred the following year. Miss Elizabeth M. Hamilton became his second wife in 1864. She was born in Pulaski County, Mo., in 1842, and she and the Doctor have become the parents of the following children: William S., born August 3, 1865; Livie L., born January 24, 1867; Hugh H., born April 7, 1868; Viola M., born May 5, 1879; Ernest A., born [p.297] December 23, 1871; Ansel B., born December 21, 1873; Arthur L., born February 10, 1876; Alexander B., born July 17, 1878; Anna P., born May 16, 1880, and Myrtle L., born January 29, 1883. Dr. Phillips resides on a good farm of 200 acres. He is a Republican in politics, and east his first vote for Stephen A. Douglas, for the Presidency. He is a member of Vidette Lodge No. 94, of the I. O. O. F., at Vina postoffice, and is Deputy Grand Master of his district, and secretary of his lodge. He is a consistent member of the General Baptist Church. He was the eldest of five children, two now living, of Zadock and Phœbe (Brown) Phillips, who were born in Athens County, Ohio, in 1813 and 1818, respectively. The father is yet living, and is engaged in farming in Douglas County, Mo., to which county he moved in 1859. His wife died in this county in March, 1889. The grandfather was born in North Carolina, and the great grandfather was of Scotland nativity.

J. M. Pickren, one of the most extensive and prominent farmers of Fulton County, Ark., is a native of the county, born November 15, 1848. His father, John Pickren, was a native of Italy, born in 1798, and when only nine years of age took passage in a vessel and worked his way to America. He landed in New York, remained there for a short time, and then went to Pennsylvania, whence, after a stay of five or six years, he journeyed to North Carolina, continuing there until about 1840, when he came to Fulton County, Ark. Previous to his advent into North Carolina he had followed various occupations, but while in that State he had charge and superintended the hands working in the gold mines of that State After coming to Arkansas he settled on the tract of land owned by his son J. M., and followed agricultural pursuits successfully for a number of years. He was killed in 1863 by the Jayhawkers, who claimed to be United States soldiers. He was married in 1841, and was sixty-five years of age at the time of his death. He was married in North Carolina to Miss Mary Stoop, a native of North Carolina, and of German origin. Five children were the fruits of this union, two of whom died when small and one was killed at the same time as the father, when sixteen years of age. Those living are: Mary, wife of H. Tracey, and is now living in North Carolina, and J. M., the subject of this sketch. The latter commenced work for himself as a farmer in 1872, and cultivated the old homestead, which consisted of 510 acres, 150 under improvement. He was married November 7 of the same year to Miss Nancy Farril, a native of Missouri, and seven children have been the result of this union: Maud, born August 4, 1874; John, born January 4, 1876; Harry, born April 21, 1878; Minnie. born February 12, 1879; Luther, born April 15, 1881; Myrtie, born June 7, 1885, and Cuthbert, born May 20, 1887. Mrs. Pickren is the daughter of Wilson and Mary (Grubb) Farril, and one of ten children, six now living: George, John, Mary, Nancy and Hardie, besides one in Ozark County. Mr. Pickren is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also of the I. O. O F.; and in his political views he is with the Democrats.

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Dr. G. W. Ray, a prominent medical practitioner of Fulton County, Ark., was born in Davidson County, Tenn., May 8, 1831, being a son of Henry D. and Lamora (Glasgow) Ray, who were born in Brunswick County, Va., and Davidson County, Tenn., January 9, 1800, and 1808, and died in the latter State in 1865 and 1873, respectively. The father removed with his parents to Tennessee when fourteen years of age, his father being Patrick Henry Ray, a native of either Scotland or Ireland–not definitely known which. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and died in Virginia. The maternal grandparents, Jesse and Catherine Glasgow, were of Scotch descent, and were born in North Carolina. Jesse was also a Revolutionary soldier and was an officer in the Continental army. Dr. G. W. Ray is the eldest of seven children, two sons and one daughter now living. After receiving his early education in the academic schools of Tennessee he adopted medicine as his profession and entered upon its practice in his native State in 1856. At the same time he was in the wholesale liquor business, following other occupations at various times until 1877, when he left Tennessee, and moved to Stoddard County, Mo. Seven years later he came to Fulton County, Ark. In 1868 he wedded Miss Susan Browning, who was born in Robertson County, Tenn., but she lived only two years after her marriage. December 18, 1888, he took for his second wife Mrs. A. C. Jeffrey, nee Cunningham. Mr. Jeffrey was a very intelligent and influential citizen, and was the author of a descriptive history of Fulton and Izard Counties, being the editor of a newspaper in the latter county. He and his wife (now Mrs. Ray) became the parents of three sons and one daughter: Curren, Lulu, Robert and Mitchell. In 1862 Dr. Ray recruited a company of soldiers in Robertson County, Tenn., and served as its captain until near the close of the war. He was also assistant surgeon of his regiment, and was in the battles of Fort Donelson and others. He is now a Democrat in his political views, but was formerly a Whig, and cast his first presidential vote for Gen. Scott. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and for many years has been one of the active and successful practitioners of the county. His wife belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

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W. P. Rhea, of the mercantile firm of W. P. Rhea & Co., of Salem. Ark., was born in East Tennessee in 1831, and while growing up attended Maryville College, receiving educational advantages which he improved. He was married, in 1855, to Miss Sarah Pile, who was born in East Tennessee September 30, 1836, and the following are the children born to their union: Laura E. (wife of R. A. Robins). David C., Joseph M., Margaret L. (wife of A. W. Ellis), Edmund G., Bettie E., Rob Preston, Kittie (who died in infancy), Oscar Lee and Holmes G. In 1866 Mr. Rhea emigrated to Arkansas, thinking to better his worldly condition, and after residing in this county for some time, and his many admirable qualities becoming known, he was elected to the offices of circuit clerk, ex-officio county clerk, clerk of the probate court, and county recorder, holding these responsible positions for ten consecutive years. Since 1883 he has also been engaged in mercantile business, but is now retired, his establishment being managed by his two partners, R. A. Robins and Arch. Northcutt. Mr. Rhea served in the late war for three years, under Gen. Long street, and was in a number of fiercely contested engagements. He has since been a Democrat in his political views, and has always been deeply interested in the cause of education. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He is the owner of 600 acres of fertile land. He was next to the youngest of eleven children, eight of whom grew to maturity, born to Joseph M, and Kittie (Myers) Rhea, who were born in East Tennessee and Berkeley County, Va., May 14, 1787, and July 28, 1788. respectively. The father was a farmer and school teacher by occupation, was reared in his native State, but was married in the "Old Dominion." He served in the War of 1812, and was in Canada during that time as private secretary to one of the officers of the army. He spent the remainder of his life in Tennessee, and died August 14, 1860, his wife having died February 25, preceding. Matthew Rhea, the grandfather of our subject, was born in Scotland, and was an early emigrant to America, and took an active part in the Revolutionary War, being a major in the Continental army, After the close of that conflict he settled in Tennessee, and was for many years clerk of Sullivan County, and held various other civil positions in the county. He died at about the age of sixty years. The maternal grandparents, Charles and Ann (Care) Myers, were Virginians, and were of German and French descent, respectively. R. A. Robins, of the above mentioned firm, and a prosperous young financier of the county, was born in Izard County, Ark., in 1852, and is a son of A. A. and Indiana (Pritchett) Robins, the former being a Virginian, who grew to manhood in his native State, but removed to Tennessee at an early day, and still later to Izard County, Ark., where he followed the occupation of carpentering R. A. Robins was educated in Philadelphia, of his native county, and upon reaching a suitable age, entered mercantile pursuits as clerk in a general store in Batesville. Independence County. Ark He remained here ten years, and then came to Salem, and in 1883 became a member of the present firm. He owns some valuable town property, and was [p.299] married, in 1882, to Miss Laura E. Rhea, who was born in Tennessee. They have two children living: Maud E. and Bernice Preston, and one child deceased, named Lillias. Mr. Robins is a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The other member of the firm, Arch. Northcutt, is a Warren County Tennesseean, his birth occurring in 1858. He left his native State when eleven years of age, and came with his people to Arkansas. He was educated in the common schools of Izard County, and worked at the monotonous duties of farm life for his father until he reached his majority, when he was married, and entered the employ of Archer & Daniels, general merchants of Salem, with whom he remained eight years, during which time he never lost a day from sickness or otherwise. In February, 1887, he became a member of the present firm, which carries a stock of about $5,000, their annual sales amounting to $25,000. Mr. Northcutt is chairman of the Democratic Central Committee of Fulton County, and is now discharging the duties of this position. He is a charter member of the I. O. O. F., and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His wife, whose maiden name was Jennie Brown, was born in the State of Ohio in 1859, and is connected to Judge O'Key. To their union have been born three children: Burton, Horace and Mamie O'Key.

Daniel P. Rogers is one of three surviving members of a family of six children of Jonathan and Martha (Knighton) Rogers, and was born in Humphreys County, Tenn., on the 26th of January, 1830. His parents are supposed to have been natives of North Carolina, the former's birth occurring in 1787, and his death in Tennessee in 1839. He was a farmer and mechanic, and served two years as a private in the War of 1812. He and his wife, who was born about 1795, were married in the State of Tennessee, and after his death the widow and her children came to Arkansas, locating in what is now Sharp County, about 1844, where she died in 1859. Daniel P. Rogers received only one month's schooling after coming to Arkansas, owing to his mother's straitened circumstances, and the necessity of his assistance at home to aid in supporting the family. He made his home with his mother until his marriage, and then she continued to reside with him until her death. His marriage to Miss Rebecca Copeland took place in 1850. She was born in Tennessee in 1832, and died six years after her marriage, having become the mother of three children: Jesse, who is married and is a farmer of the county; George, who is also married and resides on a farm; and John A., married and residing on a farm near his father. In 1858 Mr. Rogers wedded Miss Mary Dowell, who was born in Tennessee about 1845, and to them was given one son, James P., who resides in Boone County, Ark. In 1872 he was so unfortunate as to lose his second wife, but on the 8th of October, 1875, he found a true helpmate in the person of Mrs. Martha (Davis) Brasier, whose birth occurred in Whitley County, Ky., in 1839. They have two children; Martha A. and Andrew J. During the Rebellion he joined the Confederate army, and served until the final surrender, being a member of Capt. Wyatt's Company. He was at Prairie Grove and Helena, and was captured at the fall of Little Rock, being retained in that place for four months. While being taken North by his captors, he jumped from the boat near Cape Girardeau, Mo., and managed to elude his pursuers and rejoin his command. He was then in the engagement at Poison Springs, Mark's Mill, and Jenkins' Ferry, and was with Price on his raid, receiving a slight wound while with his command. At the close of the war he returned to his farm and has since resided in Fulton County, of which he was one of the pioneers. His farm embraces 200 acres, and is located between Myatt and South Fork Creeks. One hundred acres are under cultivation. He is a member of Myatt Lodge No. 401, of the A. F. & A. M., and in his political views is a Democrat, having cast his first presidential vote for Pierce. He and wife are members of the Protestant Methodist Church.

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Thomas G. Sears is another successful tiller of the soil of Fulton County who has secured his possessions by energy, determination and judicious management. He is a Georgian, born in October, 1824, and is a son of Wyatt and Frances [p.300] (Satterwhite) Sears, both natives of North Carolina, who died in Georgia in 1863 and 1868, respectively. They were married in their native State, and throughout his life the father was an industrious tiller of the soil. Thomas G. Sears, the fourth of their ten children, was educated in the common schools of his native State. Like the majority of sons he followed the occupation in which his father had always been engaged, and to which he was reared, and up to the present day has made that his calling. In the year 1875 he moved to Izard County, Ark., and in 1880 settled on the farm of 280 acres where he now lives. He has ninety acres under cultivation. In 1846 he was married in Georgia to Miss Sarah E. Payne, who was born in South Carolina in 1826, the daughter of Enoch and Sarah Payne, both natives of the "Palmetto State," who died in Georgia. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sears, but the following five are the only ones now living: Enoch G., Martha L. (wife of William Hollingsworth), James, Frances (wife of William Cochran) and Thomas. When the war had been going on for two years Mr. Sears enlisted as a private in Beauregard's battery and served until June 20, 1865, proving himself an efficient and trustworthy soldier. He was formerly a Whig and cast his vote for Henry Clay for the Presidency, but since the war has been a Democrat. He and family are all members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, with the exception of one son, who belongs to the Baptist Church, and all are substantial and law-abiding citizens. The children who are deceased are William T., who died at the age of three months; Sarah E., whose death occurred when fourteen years of age, and an infant.

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Ephraim Sharp, an old resident, and a leading merchant and farmer of the county, and proprietor of a cotton-gin and flour-mill at South Fork, in Myatt Township, twelve miles east of Salem, was born in Decatur County, Ind., June 23, 1833, and is a son of John E. and Susan (Armstrong) Sharp, who were born in Pennsylvania in 1802, and in Ohio in 1800, respectively. The father now resides in Decatur County, Ind., and, although he is eighty-seven years of age, takes a number of newspapers, and is able to read them by lamplight without his glasses. He has always followed farming as an occupation, and is of Dutch Irish ancestry. His wife died in Decatur County, Ind., in 1842, as did his father. John Sharp, who was born in Pennsylvania, his death occurring in 1842. Ephraim Sharp is one of two surviving members of a family of seven children, and was reared in Decatur County, Ind., to which place his parent-moved about 1826. He attended the common schools, and at the age of twenty-one years left home and came to Lawrence County, Ark., where he made his home until 1867, when he moved to his present property. His first purchase of land comprised 120 acres, but being a good business man he has increased this to 400 acres, and has 150 acres under cultivation, and everything about his place shows the energy and good management for which he has ever been noted. In 1868 he opened a general mercantile establishment under the firm name of Wainwright & Sharp, but in 1873 he purchased Mr. Wainwright's interest, and conducted affairs alone until 1884, when he sold out to Dr. J. S. Risher. He re-purchased the goods the following year, and has remained proprietor of the same ever since. In 1875 South Fork postoffice was established at Mr. Sharp's store, and he was appointed postmaster, which he has since remained, with the exception of one year. He was married in Sharp County, Ark., November 22, 1858, to Miss Mary E. Wainwright, who was born in Madison County. Ala., in June. 1833. Six of the seven children born to their union are now living: Martha M., wife of Hardy Croom: Joanna C., wife of C. W. Culp; Sarah B., Johnnie (deceased), Thomas W., Hettie L. and Ollie J. In 1862 Mr. Sharp enlisted in the Confederate army, and was first lieutenant of Company L. Tappen's brigade. He served in this capacity two years, participating in the battle of Prairie Grove, and numerous skirmishes; then he was honorably discharged, and returned to his home in Indiana, where he remained until 1866. He is a member of Myatt Lodge No. 401, of the Masonie order, and in his political views is a stanch Democrat, having cast his first presidential vote for James Buchanan. [p.301] He and all his children, with the exception of the youngest, are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

Rev. J. L. Short, Sr., a prominent agriculturist of Washington Township, Fulton County, Ark., and the son of Joab and Sarah (York) Short, was born in Franklin County, Tenn., in 1824. His parents were natives of Rockingham County, N. C., and were of Irish descent. Joab Short was born on the 12th of August, 1788, and died on the 1st of April, 1866. The mother was born in 1790, and died in September, 1870. They left their native State about 1810, and moved to Tennessee. They were the parents of thirteen children, all of whom lived to be grown: Alpha, wife of E. Thacker; Omega, wife of A. Muse; Mary, wife of Rev. John Byrum; Gracie and July (twins), the former the wife of P. Holley, and the latter of F. M. Yell; Sarah, wife of Thomas Muse; Tabitha, wife of John Antney; Delia, wife of William Walsh (deceased); Caroline, wife of John Ross; J. L., Constant B. (deceased), Joab B., killed at the battle of Shiloh, and C. C. (deceased). Mr. Short was a Democrat in politics, and was a very prominent man in his section of the country. He was quite wealthy, and was the owner of a number of slaves. His son, Rev. J. L. Short, had all the advantages for a thorough education in his youth, enjoying opportunities above the average. Since then, by close study and observation, he has become a well informed man. He commenced work for himself at the age of nineteen as a tiller of the soil, and this he has followed since in connection with his pastoral work. His wife was formerly Miss Frances Hawkins, a native of Tennessee, whom he married on the 22d of November, 1842. One child was born to this union, named Sarah, who became the wife of J. W. Blanton, and now resides in Cooke County, Tex. Mrs. Short died in April, 1844, and our subject was married the second time to Mrs. Frances B. (Campbell) Short, widow of Col. A. M. Short, who was in the Mexican War, and took part in some of the prominent engagements of that war. He was county clerk of Coffee County. Tenn., at the time of his death, which occurred in 1852 or 1853. He left two children, J. L., who lives in Fulton County, and is engaged in farming, and Nancy J., wife of John Pendergrass, who is a tiller of the soil and resides in Izard County. J. L. Short's second marriage occurred in 1857, and to this union were born eight children: Tabitha P., born on the 12th of December, 1860, is now at home; C. B., born in March, 1863, is married and lives in Izard County; M. L., born June 24, 1865; J. B., born March 11, 1867; Julia F., born May 4, 1869, and the wife of Mr. Lavell; Manrie, lives in Fulton County; J. M., born April 5, 1872, and J. N., born June 24, 1875. Mrs. Short was born in 1831, and is the daughter of John and Helender (Neel) Campbell, natives of South Carolina and Virginia, respectively. Mr. Campbell was justice of the peace of his section for many years, was in very comfortable circumstances and a much respected citizen. He was the father of eleven children: William (deceased), James, a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and ex-county treasurer of Coffee County, Tenn. (he is now living in the Lone Star State); Sarah, widow of R. Blanton, and Nancy, widow of Coleman Blanton, live in Tennessee; Caroline, widow of M. Holland, and now residing in Bedford County, Tenn.; Armsted is a farmer and lives in Texas; Susan resides in Texas; Civility, wife of James Angle, resides in Texas; Frances B., Duncan, lives in Coffee County, Tenn., and John T. (deceased), Rev. J. L. Short has been a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church thirty-three years, and his wife is a member of that denomination. He also belongs to the A. F. & A. M., and in his political views affiliates with the Democratic party. He is the owner of 270 acres of land. Previous to coming to Fulton County he had lived in Izard, Independence, and other counties of the State.

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Hon. J. L. Short, Jr. The public services of Mr. Short have been characterized by a noticeable devotion to the welfare of Fulton County, and his ability and fidelity in his present position have made a lasting impression upon his sphere of public duty. Although a young man, his name has always been closely identified with the interests of this section and he need have no fear as to his [p.302] future prosperity. He was born in Coffee County, Tenn., in 1858, being the seventh of a family of nine children, all of whom are living, born to Rev. J. L. and Frances B. (Campbell) Short, both of whom were born in Tennessee, the former's birth occurring in 1824. They were reared, married and remained in their native State until 1870, at which time they settled in Izard County, Ark, moving afterward to Sharp County, and finally to Fulton County, where the father engaged in tilling the soil and also preached the gospel,- being a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He belonged to the White River conference and was a circuit rider. He and wife now reside in Fulton County. The paternal grandfather was a North Carolinian. J. L. Short, our subject, was placed in school as soon as a suitable age was reached, where the opportunities afforded were enjoyed and improved to the best advantage. He attended an academy and evening high school, and the reputation he now enjoys as a bright and able young lawyer was acquired through his own efforts and at the expense of diligent study and hard practical experience. He graduated from the law department of the University of Mississippi in 1881, and since 1886 has been one of the leading members of the legal fraternity in Salem. In 1888 he was elected to represent the county in the State legislature, and is discharging his duties to the entire satisfaction of his constituents. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was married in October, 1886, to Miss Josephine Roberts, who was born in 1869.

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Dr. Benjamin S. Thomason, of Fulton County, Ark., first saw the light of day April 1, 1841, in Dickson County, Tenn., and is one of eleven children born to John and Nancy (Swift) Thomason, natives of South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. John Thomason was born in 1807 and came to Tennessee when yet a boy. In that State Mrs. Thomason was born in 1819. They were the parents of these children: James W., who died in prison at Chicago in 1862; Elijah, who died in 1877; B. S., Hannah, wife of James W. Swindle and died June 5, 1881; John lives in Greene County, Ark.; Elizabeth, wife of Peter Woods, and resides in Greene County; Nancy lives in Greene County: Richard lives in the same county: Jemimah, wife of Bud Newsom, of Greene County, Ark., and Victoria, wife of John McMillan, of Greene County. John Thomason entered the service of the Confederate army in 1862 under Col. Knapper, and was in a number of battles. He was captured, sent to prison in Chicago, and there died in 1863. He followed trading as his occupation in life, and made a specialty of negroes and land. His farm was cultivated by negroes and whites. He always voted the Democratic ticket. Benjamin S. Thomason left the parental roof in 1859 and journeyed to Kentucky, where he remained for some time. He then returned to Tennessee, and made his home with his uncle for a number of years, and in the meantime attended school. He also clerked in a store until the breaking out of the late unpleasantness between the North and South, when he enlisted in the Eleventh Tennessee Infantry, Company C, William Green, captain, and commanded by James E. Rains. Mr. Thomason served from May 9, 1861, until the close of the war and participated in the most prominent battles. He was in the following engagements besides numerous minor ones: Barbersville, London Wild Cat, Fishing Creek, Goose Creek. Richmond, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Shelbyville, Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain and Atlanta. His brother, Elijah, was in forty-three pitched battles, but was never seriously wounded. Benjamin S. Thomason was wounded at Murfreesboro in the left wrist and this disabled him from service for some time. He was taken prisoner at Thompson's Station, Tenn., and remained a prisoner at Fort Delaware for some time. When exchanged he was in a very sorry condition. He surrendered at Memphis, Tenn., April 26, 1865. He was first married November 20, 1875, to Miss Ellen Canuoy, of New Madrid County, Mo., and by her became the father of six children, only two now living: Hettie M. T., born January 19, 1880, and Benjamin W., born December 7, 1882, Mrs. Thomason died July 6, 1886, and Mr. Thomason then married Miss Mary F. Roby, of Fulton County, Ark., November 4, 1886. One child was born to this union, [p.303] Josie M., whose birth occurred July 21, 1887. Mr. Thomason is the owner of 210 acres of land, and is a very enterprising farmer. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Thomason is a member of the A. F. & A. M., and in his political views affiliates with the Democratic party.

Dr. William A. Thompson, an eminent medical practitioner, who has recently located in Mammoth Spring, is a native of Pope County, Ill., where he was born December 22, 1852, being a son of Jacob A. and Polly (Shuffelbarger) Thompson, who were born in West Virginia in 1819 and Pennsylvania in 1824, respectively. The former, with his parents, was among the very earliest settlers of Pope County, and there the latter couple died. Jacob Thompson inherits Scotch and Irish blood from his parents, and has inherited many of the sterling qualities of his Scottish ancestors. He has been a farmer throughout life, is still residing in Pope County, and in his political views has always been a Democrat. He was a faithful soldier for the Union cause throughout the Rebellion, and was a participant in the battle of Pittsburg Landing, and numerous other important battles, and was promoted to the rank of orderly sergeant. He was one of the men who went through on the Gerrison raid. His wife died in Pope County the first year of the war, having borne a family of eight children, only four of whom are now living: One a merchant in Alton, Mo., another a stockman of Kansas, one a minister of the gospel, and the Doctor. The latter was nine years of age when his mother died, and shortly after his father went to the war, and he was left to make his home with a neighbor. At the age of fourteen years he went to Northern Illinois, and received excellent educational opportunities (which he did not fail to improve) in McKendrie College, St. Clair County, Ill. In the spring of 1883 he was graduated from the Medical University of Louisville, Ky., and after practicing a very short time in Stoddard County, Mo., he moved to Oregon County, where he became a well known and successful-practitioner. Since the first of the year 1889 he has resided in Mammoth Spring, where he is winning the confidence and respect of all who know him. In March, 1876, he was married to Miss Amanda Miller, who was born in Stoddard County, Mo., in 1856, and was there reared to womanhood. She died in 1882, having borne two children: Birdie and Hattie. She was a daughter of George F. and Sarah (Hardy) Miller, both of whom spent their lives in Stoddard County. Mrs. Margaret George became Dr. Thompson's second wife in December, 1883. Her birth occurred in Randolph County, Ark., in 1846, she being a daughter of Rev. R. O. Tribble, a Missionary Baptist minister, and the first minister of Oregon County. The Doctor and his wife have one child, William A. He owns 700 acres of land in Oregon County, Mo., and his home lot in Mammoth Spring comprises three acres. He is a member of the Masonic lodge at Alton, Mo., and in his political views has always been a stanch Republican, having cast his first presidential vote for R. B. Hayes. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. His first wife belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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Robert L. Thompson, who is closely connected with the farming interests of the county, is of Arkansas nativity, and dates his birth from December 30, 1856. His father, G. W. Thompson, was a native of Tennessee, a farmer and stock trader, and accumulated considerable property. He came to Fulton County at an early day, and there met and married Miss Eliza Pumphrey about 1848. Eight children were born to this union, three now living: H. J., living in Baxter County; Robert L., in Fulton, and G. W., who resides in Boone County. The father of these children left Fulton County several years ago, and has not been heard from since. He is supposed to be dead. In politics he affiliated with the Republican party. Mrs. Thompson resides in Boone County, Ark. Robert L. Thompson passed his youth and early manhood in his native State, Arkausas. On the 12th of December, 1880, he married Miss Emma E. Cook, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Harris) Cook, and one of six children born to their union; Ephraim (deceased), Sarah J., Mary, Pernecia, William W., Emma E. and Alice. Henry W. Cook was born in Kentucky, July 22, 1822, [p.304] and married Miss Elizabeth Harris, of the same State about 1844. They moved to Arkansas in 1860, where he died March 17, 1877. He was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and also of the Masonic lodge at the time of his death. His widow still remains on the old homestead at Viola. Alice, the youngest child, who is now a widow with two children, resides with her brother, William W., whose home is in Texas. He is a lawyer by profession, and unmarried. The other five have homes in Arkansas, and are married. The fruits of Mr. and Mrs. Thompson's union are three children: Huston B., born May 11, 1883; Nora A., born January 24, 1885, and James T., born August 5, 1887. At the commencement of his farm life, Mr. Thompson had 120 acres, and has since added eighty acres. He now owns considerable stock, consisting of hogs, cattle and horses. He is considered one of the leading farmers in this section. He is a man greatly in favor of public enterprises, and donates liberally to school, churches and all laudable movements. Politically, he is a native-born Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Thompson professed religion in September, 1885, and joined the church in August, 1888. Mrs. Thompson professed religion August 17, 1874, and joined on the 20th of the same month. She has been a member of the church fifteen years, becoming such while only fourteen years old.

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David P. Tunstall, one of the leading citizens of Fulton County, Ark., is a native of Independence County, of the same State, his birth occurring on the 7th of July, 1841. His father, Thomas T. Tunstall, was born in Pittsylvania County, Va., and when a boy removed with his parents to Shelby County, Ky., where he grew to mature years and learned the cabinet maker's trade, at which occupation he worked for a few years. He afterward turned his attention to steamboating, and after residing in Chicot County, Ark., for six years he moved to Independence County in 1833, in which county he was residing at the time of his death, in November, 1863, at the age of seventy-six years. During his lifetime he farmed for some time, and while steamboating brought the first boat up the White River. He accumulated considerable wealth in the different enterprises in which he was engaged, and at one time was worth over $100,000, but lost heavily during the bank crash of 1841. He was in the cavalry service during the War of 1812, and in one engagement had a horse shot from under him. He took a great interest in the political affairs of his day and was one of the best politicians of the State at that time, although not an office-seeker. He was married three times, but the name of his first wife is unknown. His second wife was a Miss Sarah World, who died after having borne eight children, only one of whom is now living: James M., a farmer, of Independence County. His last marriage was to Miss Elizabeth Magness, by whom he became the father of eleven children, five of whom are living: Harrison M., David P., Laura (wife of J. M. Archer), Rose (wife of Richard A. McHenry), and Kate J. (wife of C. A. Phillips, a prominent attorney of Fulton County). David P. Tunstall received his education in Jackson County, Ark., but in 1861 gave up all his work to enlist in Company E, of the Seventh Arkansas Infantry, Confederate service, and served until April, 1864, the last two years being orderly sergeant. He was at Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, the Atlanta campaign and Jonesboro, Ga., where he was taken prisoner. He managed to escape by jumping from a train at Decherd Station, Tenn. He was recaptured five days later and was taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he was kept until February 14, 1865. He was paroled at Richmond and returned home. His clothes were many times riddled with bullets and at Murfreesboro he had one of his pants-legs shot off. He then remained in Independence County, Ark., until 1877, at which time he came to Fulton County, where he has since made his home. He owns some of the best farming land in the county, his property being located on South Fork. In 1880 he was elected to the office of county sheriff and collector, and was re-elected in 1884. On the 25th of May, 1865, he was married to Miss Martha Jernigan, a daughter of Rev. William H. Jernigan. [p.305] She was born in Henry County, Tenn., in 1845 (August 16), and to their union the following children have been born: Lemuel E. (farming his father's farm), William T., James F., Harrison M., Dicy E., Charles P., Daniel A. and Grover C. Mr. and Mrs. Tunstall are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he is a stanch Democrat in his politics. On coming home from the army he was without means, and all his property has been acquired since then, and notwithstanding the fact that he has had to pay a great many security-debts he has prospered. He is a second cousin of Abraham Lincoln's wife, his grandmother being a Todd.

E. L. Tunstall, M. D., a widely known and most successful physician of Mammoth Spring, Ark., was born in Independence County, of this State, in September, 1864. He is a son of H. M. and Melissa (Baker) Tunstall, who were born respectively in Independence County, Ark., and Middle Tennessee. The father was reared to a mercantile life in his native county, was married there, and a few years since came to Fulton County, Ark., and engaged in various pursuits at Mammoth Spring. He and wife, who came to Arkansas at the age of five years, became the parents of three children, of whom Dr. E. L. Tunstall is the second. The paternal grandfather was a native of the "Old Dominion," and removed to Kentucky during the early history of that State, afterward locating in Arkansas, where he engaged in steamboating and horse-dealing, accumulating a large amount of property thereby. The great-grandfather came from Wales and located in Virginia. Dr. E. L. Tunstall was educated in the graded schools of his native county, and during this time acquired a taste for the study of medicine. He determined to make this his profession, and for some time at first studied under a preceptor, and attended his first course of lectures in the Missouri Medical College at St. Louis, during the winter of 1884-85. He graduated from the Memphis Hospital Medical College in the spring of 1887 (the regular school). After practicing in Ozark County, Mo., for some time, he commenced practicing in Fulton County in the fall of 1885. Miss Mary A. Tyree, who was born in Pulaski County, Mo., in February, 1867, became his wife in October, 1882, and to their marriage have been given two bright little children: Katie S. D. and A. G. Thurman. The Doctor is a member of the Tri-State Medical Society, which meets once a year at Memphis. Tenn. Politically he is a Democrat.

William Wainwright is recognized as a careful, energetic agriculturist of Fulton County, and by his advanced ideas, progressive habits, and liberal contributions to worthy enterprises, he has gained the respect and esteem of his fellow men. His birth occurred in Madison County, Ala., in 1826, and he is a son of William and Nancy (Turner) Wainwright, who were born in Virginia and Tennessee. respectively. Upon first leaving his native State, he went to Georgia, but before his marriage moved from Alabama, where he had located, to Arkansas, in 1853, locating in Independence County, but afterward died in Sharp County in 1855, at the age of seventy-three years. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. William Wainwright is one of his nine children, and was reared to manhood on a farm in Alabama, but when his father came to the State of Arkansas, he came with him and here has since made his home. He was married in Sharp County, on the 28th of February, 1860, to Miss Margaret Elizabeth Huddleston, and by her has had a family of nine children: John B., who died at the age of nine months; Louise, who died in 1884 at the age of twenty-two years: Laura P., William E., Mary M., Martha M., Samuel P., Lucy M. and Gundoland. During the late Civil War Mr. Wainwright served four years under Gen Price being in the commissary department the most of the time. In 1862 he came to Fulton County, Ark., and is now the owner of 1.346 acres of land in the country and considerable property in town. He has the finest dwelling house in the county, it being a fine brick structure containing eight large rooms. Politically he has always affiliated with the Democratic party, and socially he is a member of the A. F. & A. M., being a Master Mason. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

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Rev. William E. Watson, a Methodist minister and farmer of Fulton Township, was born in Ballard County, Ky., in 1846, and received very meager educational advantages. He remained with his widowed mother until sixteen years of age and then, in June, 1863, he enlisted in Company B, Wood's Battalion of Missouri Cavalry, Confederate troops, and served until the close of the war, most of his operations being in Arkansas. He was in the engagement at Pine Bluff, and all through Price's raid in Missouri. At one time while a soldier there was some talk of promoting him for bravery to the position of fourth corporal. He was captured during that raid in Kansas, in October, 1864, and was a prisoner about four months at St. Louis and Alton, Ill. He was paroled just before the general surrender, rejoined his command and surrendered in May, 1865, at Shreveport, La. He then came to Izard County, and was married in June, 1866, to Miss Martha J. Williams, a native of Kentucky, and the daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Williams, also of Kentucky nativity. Her parents died in Izard County, whither they had moved when Mrs. Watson was a little girl. The fruits of Mr. Watson's union were seven children, four sons and one daughter now living. He remained in Izard County until 1875, and then came to his present farm, which was then in the woods, but now he has 160 acres, with fifty under cultivation. He has a pleasant home, one and a half miles east of Viola, and aside from his farming interest he has been local minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for about ten years, administering to the spiritual wants of his fellow men in a very satisfactory manner. He has been a member of that church for a period of about twenty-two years. He is a Democrat in his political preferences and has held the office of justice of the peace since September, 1888. He has one brother, James M., and a sister, the widow of William Ferguson, who are living in Fulton County. His parents. Miles and Mary S. (Gillespie) Watson, were born in Kentucky, where the father died when William E. was an infant. In about 1853 the family moved to Lawrence County, Ark., where Mrs. Watson married William Hawkins. She afterward moved to Fulton County, and died about 1862, in what is now Baxter County. She had been a member of the Methodist Church for many years.

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Z. L. Watters, M. D., is of Scotch Irish birth and antecedents, and his ancestors for four generations back have been prominently identified with the interests of the State of Georgia, his father, Joseph Watters, having been a prominent politician of that State in the days of his prime. The latter was born in 1792 and was reared to manhood in his native State. During the Florida War he served as captain under Gen. Nelson. He was a member of the legislature from Floyd County, and was also a United States Senator from his senatorial district, comprising three counties. His death occurred in 1866. His wife was born in Oglethorpe County in 1799, and became the mother of thirteen children, ten sons and three daughters, all of whom grew to maturity. All the former served in the Confederate army with the exception of two brothers. One brother was killed at Sharpsburg while serving in Lee's army, and another at Atlanta. Dr. Z. L. Watters, our subject, was captain of a company from Gordon County, Ga., and for gallant service was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and served until Lee's surrender. He received his literary education at Rome, Ga., and being now prepared to carry out a long cherished desire he entered upon a course of medical study, entering the medical college of his native State, from which he graduated in 1852. He had practiced until the opening of the war at Calhoun, Ga., and also at other places in that State,

and after the war he again located in Calhoun, residing there until he came to Arkansas in December, 1869. From that time until quite recently he was engaged in practicing his profession at Salem, and acquired a superior reputation as an able physician and surgeon. A short time since he retired from practice and is now conducting a drug store, for which he is thoroughly qualified. He was for many years the only physician in the place, and owing to his remarkably successful career as such he has become the owner of 820 acres of land in three different farms. He was married in 1866 to Miss M. A. Humphreys, but he was called upon to mourn her loss by death in 1874. She left two children: Frank and Nora. He subsequently wedded his present wife, whose maiden name was Samantha Jeffrey. The following are the children which have been given them: Zula Lee, Nettie Medora, Lamar, Lella and Ethel. Dr. Watters is a Democrat, and has shown his brotherly spirit by becoming a Mason.

S. P. Welden, treasurer of Fulton County, Ark., was born in Jackson County, Tenn., June 15, 1832, but was reared in the State of Kentucky, receiving fairly good advantages for acquiring an education in the old subscription schools of early days. His boyhood days were spent in following the plow, and learning the blacksmith's trade, the two occupations receiving his attention for a number of years. He was married at the age of twenty-four years, to Miss Elizabeth S. Duncan, in Bollinger County, Mo. She was born in Livingston County, Ky., May 7, 1838, and to their union five children were born, all of whom have passed to their long home: Mary A., born December 27, 1857, died March 14, 1858; an infant, born May 6, 1859, died the same day; Madoriah F., born July 20, 1860, died October 23, 1872; Ewell B., born February 2, 1864, died December 19, 1882; and one other infant, born November 2, 1867, died the same day. Mr. Welden bought two quarter sections of land in Fulton County, Ark., in 1868, and moved here in 1881. He resided on his property until elected to the office of county treasurer in September. 1884, when he located at the county seat of Fulton County. He was re-elected in September, 1886, and again re-elected in September, 1888, his majority being each year increased; and although he has only been a resident of the county a few years, he has become one of its prominent citizens, and is respected by all for his sterling integrity, sound judgment and liberal, progressive ideas. He now owns over 900 acres of land in the county, ten forty-acre pieces being in one body. He is an old line Democrat, and is the master of Salem Lodge No. 418, of the A. F. & A. M. Mr. Welden was the third in a family of twelve children, seven boys and five girls, eight of whom are now living, born to William Welden and wife, formerly a Miss Jones, the former being probably a native of North Carolina, born June 12, 1809, and the latter of Tennessee, born May 11, 1809. William Welden moved to Tennessee with his father when young, and was there married to Mary R. Jones, subsequently following the occupation of farming. He is still living, and is residing at Pinkneyville, Livingston County, Ky. His wife died on the 18th day of March, 1865. The paternal grandfather, Daniel Welden, was born in North Carolina, and died in Kentucky at the home of our subject, between ninety-five and one hundred years of age. He was a veteran in the War of 1812, under Andrew Jackson. The great grandfather, Pines Welden, was a Revolutionary soldier, and was of Scotch-Irish descent.

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Marion Whiteside is a resident of Fulton County, Ark., who seems to be eminently fitted for the occupation of farming, for he possesses industry and good-business ability, and from earliest boyhood has been familiar with the details of farm life. He was born in Oregon County, Mo., October 11, 1850, but was reared in Fulton County, Ark., remaining with his parents until he attained his majority, and, although he received no schooling he became familiar with the details of farming and blacksmithing, which occupations his father followed. He has continued the former occupation ever since starting out in life for himself, and since 1873 has lived on his present farm of 120 acres, fifty-five acres of which are under cultivation. He has always been a Democrat politically, and his first vote for the Presidency was cast for Horace Greeley. He is now deputy assessor of his township, has been constable of Mammoth Spring Township two years, and has served seven years as school director, and is elected for two more years. He is a member of Mammoth Spring Lodge No. 48, of the I. O. O. F. July 7, 1872, he was united in marriage to Miss Annis Mooney, who was born in Dent County, Mo., about 1852, and by her he became the father of eight children, six of whom are living: Margaret E., Jackson F., Martha L., Josephine, Minnie A. and Monroe C. Mrs. Whiteside is a daughter of John and Margaret [p.308] Mooney, who were native Tennesseeans, and were early settlers of Dent County, Mo. The father died in that State, but the mother's death occurred in Arkansas. Mr. Whiteside is one of eight surviving members of a family of eleven children, nine of whom reside in Fulton County, Ark., and one in Oregon County, Mo., born to Hayes and Sarah J. (Payne) Whiteside, who were born in Indiana and Missouri, in 1833 and 1836, respectively. The father was brought to Arkansas by his parents when nine years of age, and became a noted hunter of Fulton County and lived in this county until his death, August 27, 1879, still survived by his widow. The paternal grandfather, Thomas Whiteside, was a Virginian, and with his wife moved from that State to Indiana, at a very early day, and later to Fulton County, Ark., of which they were among the earliest settlers. He was also a noted hunter and while on a hunting expedition was taken sick and died in Independence County, Ark. His wife died in Fulton County, Ark.